Tag Archives: speakers

Klipsch KPT-904 Speakers (Frankenstein Edition)

Longtime Klipsch fan and forum member Jonathan Wood had a 32′ x 38’ room that desperately needed great audio. That’s over 1,200 feet of space.

A couple years ago, Jonathan was lucky enough to check out the powerful Klipsch KPT-904 cinema speakers in action at the house of his friend Ryan Hendrix.

“I knew I needed a pair of my own.”

The KPT-904 is an exceptional sounding midsize screen and stage speaker that excels at stadium seating. A Tractrix® Horn-loaded, 3-inch titanium compression driver coupled with a dual 15-inch woofer allows for excellent efficiency and dynamics.

To translate the marketing fluff: the KPT-904 is a kick-ass speaker that can fill up a whole lot of space like Jonathan’s.

Jonathan told Ryan “to keep his ears and eyes peeled through his network of Klipsch heads.” Ryan’s dad, Bill Hendrix, happened to be an owner of the KPT-904s himself and also maintained long-standing friends with multiple Klipsch engineers. Thankfully, Bill had a friend who was interested in selling his speakers.

It wasn’t for the stock KPT-904, though. It was for something more…twisted…monstrous…diabolical…a strange concoction of parts.

Frankenstein Klipsch Speakers 7 social

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix


Jonathan snapped up this quasi-clone – a twisted creation – of the KPT-904. (PLEASE SEE DISCLAIMER BELOW.)

It all starts with the Klipsch KP-450 bass bin. To make it like the KPT-904, the previous owner added a B&C DE75 compression driver, using an EAW horn instead of the K-510. (Jonathan is looking to replace the EAW horn with a K-510 soon, though.)

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Jonathan asked Bob Crites to build new networks that followed the 904 schematic, but to pad the horn down by 3db since they are used for two-channel music instead of home theater or theater use where they would be behind the screen.

Adding to the Frankenstein-nature of these speakers, Jonathan decided to paint them. Luckily, one of his friends does custom paintwork, so he had them painted a medium warm grey on the bass bins and a gloss orange-red on the horn.

“Because, why not?!”

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Jonathan also had the custom perforated steel grilles made for the Frankenstein speakers by another member of the Klipsch forum, completing their striking look.

The speakers are currently setup in a two-channel audio configuration. To power these monsters, Jonathan is currently running them through an Odyssey Kismet amplifier and Juicy Music Blueberry Xtreem 2 pre-amplifier. The amplifiers in the photos are the Parasound ZAmps running in bridged mono. His source is an “older” Denon DP-1250 with a Sumiko MMT tonearm and Ortofon 2M Blue cartridge.

How do they sound?

“They are excellent in my space for their intended purpose.”

Nice work, Frankenstein.

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Photo c/o Ryan Hendrix

Do you know of any other Klipsch Frankenstein speakers? Let us know in the comments!

The above story is NOT an endorsement of the customization and modifications of Klipsch speakers. We do NOT recommend the methods above and these modifications will void you product’s warranty. The speakers that we ship to customers are what the engineers intended and are designed to be the best sounding speakers on Earth.

(It’s just kind of cool. That’s all.)

Five Best Movies for Upmixing with Dolby Atmos

As we have covered in a previous blog post, Dolby Atmos isn’t just for new movies that were edited specifically for the technology. Upmixing with Dolby Atmos brings a new dimension to your surround sound whether it be for movies, music, video games, sporting events or whatever.

Many of you asked for specific examples, so we went through our movie collection and picked out the best movies to show off upmixing with Dolby Atmos.

(Really, we just wanted an excuse to go to one of our theaters and relive these movies on Reference Premiere Dolby Atmos enabled speakers.)

WARNING: There could be some minor spoilers…that being said, if you haven’t seen these movies yet, our sympathy is limited.


One of Steven Spielberg’s finest efforts is worth seeing all over again with upmixed Dolby Atmos sound. The unforgettable and gut-wrenching invasion of Normandy scene is a great showcase for the efforts from Dolby’s engineering team. Bullets and mortars zoom right over your head. The underwater scenes are that much more immersive and intense. The soundtrack was already quite dynamic in 5.1. Dolby Atmos somehow kicks it up another notch.


There are a bunch of scenes in this movie that Trekkies and normies alike will appreciate the impressive upmixed sound. One particular highlight is when the USS Vengeance is catching up to the Enterprise. Going warp speed has never been so exciting (and that’s saying something). The added dimension is also quite apparent during the movie’s opening scene with the animal sounds.


It feels like not nearly enough people have seen this action movie, starring Tom Cruice and Emily Blunt. It’s a fantastic movie in addition to a stellar showcase for Dolby Atmos, particularly the reoccurring battle scenes. You can practically feel the air rushing around him as the main character falls from the sky, displaying incredible ambient effects. The distant battle sounds sound really expansive through the additional Dolby Atmos channels. Without revealing too much, the “swirling” aliens are much more intimidating and overwhelming as well thanks to the Dolby Atmos upmixing.


Sure, the plot kind of stinks and it goes on for far too long but…those jungle scenes! The ambience and wildlife sounds of the jungle completely envelop the listener. While the action scenes are incredibly immersive and three dimensional, the quieter, dialogue based scenes are impressive examples of Dolby Atmos technology.


Atmosphere and tension is everything in Prometheus, making it a natural fit for Dolby Atmos. Upmixing utilizes height effects brilliantly during the storm scene when they are running back to the ship with clouds and sand swirling overhead. Any of the cave scenes also have a lot of ambience including water drops, falling stones, and lots of echo all over the place – around and above.




40 Years and Counting with Klipsch Heresy Speakers

When Candace Tinkler turned 20 years old, her father treated her to Klipsch Heresy speakers. Now, 40 years later, Candace remains in love with the speakers she received on her 20th birthday.

“It was a big deal to splurge on these luxury items,” Tinkler said. “My father had a deep love of music which he shared with me. He grew up during The Great Depression and his family didn’t have money for him to take music lessons, so he showered me with musical opportunities that he never had.”

Before making the leap, Tinkler and her father did their research. Although she doesn’t remember exactly what the key reasons were for picking the Heresy speakers, Tinker had spoken with both her professional musician friends and employees from several high-end audio stores who all recommended Klipsch.

After hearing a demo of these handcrafted speakers at a specialty audio store in San Francisco, her Dad was so excited that he purchased a pair for the family home in addition to the pair he bought for her. Although he may have passed away two years ago at the age of 89, his Heresy speakers continue to rock in the family home.

Since their purchase in 1975, Tinkler’s Heresy speakers have been moved all over the United States, far away from the speakers’ birthplace in Hope, Arkansas. As a National Park Service employee, they have “survived” Zion, Bighorn Canyon, Channel Islands, Grand Canyon, Everglades, New River Gorge and, currently, Redwood National Parks.

The question of whether it is worth it to carry these 44 lb. speakers from place to place is downright silly to Tinkler.

“I love these speakers! I have never thought of myself as a hoarder and, in fact, I am a bit ruthless about getting rid of junk that doesn’t work to my expectations. On the other hand, I hang on to things I love.”

Currently residing in Crescent City, California, Tinkler’s American-made speakers have gained notoriety throughout the town.

“Every July 4th during the fireworks, I open the windows, turn the speakers towards the street and crank the volume up crazy high. Everyone cheers! It is a town tradition. The speakers are so loud, it is like a rock concert!”

The speakers’ survival and impeccable condition even more remarkable because Tinkler never even got around to staining the speakers’ bare wood.

“Can you believe it?”

Heck, yes. This is Klipsch.


How long have you had your Klipsch speakers? Post a comment below!

Candace Tinkler Klipsch Heresy Speakers

Klipsch Install Stories: Sun King Fishers Tap Room & Small-Batch Brewery

Sun King Brewing Company was founded in 2009 by Dave Colt and Clay Robinson. They have had extraordinary success focusing on “continually creating traditional, seasonal and unique specialty beers.”

Sun King’s main brewery and offices are located just a few miles south from the Klipsch headquarters in downtown Indianapolis, IN. A couple years ago, we installed Klipsch speakers there, dutifully pumping music into the brewery as visitors sip on tasty beverages.

Colt and Robinson are looking to repeat that success in the Indianapolis suburb of Fishers, IN. While their plans for a full-scale brewery have been temporarily put on the hold, the award-winning brewing company built a taproom nearby. The location will eventually have a small-batch brewery inside where the mad beer scientists will concoct all sorts of delicious, hoppy beers.

Robinson said, “The new Sun King Fishers Tap Room & Small-Batch Brewery was designed with local in mind. Aside from production of Fresh•Local•Beer, when you look around you will notice that our tables, bar and light fixtures were handcrafted from locally sourced and repurposed wood, so to complete the space, it only made sense to equip the space with great sound provided by our local partner Klipsch.”

For the install, we teamed up with Randy Monteith Audio & Video LLC out of Greenwood, IN. Monteith has been in business since 1991 and is well-known throughout the Indianapolis-area for providing stellar custom audio solutions.

Sun King Fishers Tap Room Brewery Photo 2

In the taproom, there is a lengthy list of taps (duh!) with all sorts of delicious beers available in pints or growlers. For this area, we installed hanging KI-262-SMA-II speakers and a “flying” KPT-684-SW-SMA subwoofer, which were handcrafted at our manufacturing facility in Hope, AR. The subwoofer is particularly impressive, as it is quite monstrous and more-than-capable of delivering superior bass performance.

Sun King Fishers Tap Room Brewery Photo 3

The party room is stocked with IC-525-T and KPH-525 speakers. These pendant speakers integrate really well into Sun King’s industrial look. The brewing area is equipped with CA-650-T speakers, which stay out of the way and allow the brewers to focus on what they do best – make gold-medal winning beer.

If you find yourself in the Fishers-area, definitely stop by for a cold one and, of course, top-notch Klipsch sound.

We might just head over there right now ourselves…

Do you have questions or comments about this Klipsch install? Post in the comments section below.

Sun King Fishers Tap Room Brewery Photo 1

Sun King Fishers Tap Room Brewery Photo 4

Sun King Fishers Tap Room Brewery Photo 7

Sun King Fishers Tap Room Brewery Photo 8

For more photos, please click here.

Made in USA Speakers

The very first Klipsch speaker sold was made by hand back in 1946 in the little town of Hope, Arkansas. Paul W. Klipsch (PWK) built the horn himself out of a tin shed while the original cabinet was made by the local Reed’s Cabinet Shop.

A lot has changed since 1946, but some things haven’t. We still make many of our speakers in that sleepy little southern town with pride and respect for the formula (PWK) bestowed upon us.

The tin shed is now a full-fledged factory with its own cabinet production line and the company’s headquarters have moved to Indianapolis, Indiana; however, the mission remains the same for all of our “Made in USA” speakers. We want to make the world’s best speakers that bring the live music experience to your living room…or wherever you may need music.

Here’s a rundown of our Made in USA speakers…

Klipschorn Speaker Made in USA

Klipschorn (Heritage Series)

Paul W. Klipsch created the Klipschorn because he wanted to bring the live music experience to his home. Boy, he succeeded and then some, didn’t he? With it’s brilliant highs and deep lows, it’s truly the classic American speaker. (Klipschorn history)

It may be hard to believe, but the design of the Klipschorn has genuinely not changed much since PWK made his first one in 1946. It is the only speaker to be in continuous production for over 70 years. We’ve tweaked it here and there, but, as the old saying goes: “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Klipsch La Scala Made in USA

La Scala II (Heritage Series)

Named after the Teatro alla Scala in Italy, the original La Scala was unveiled in 1963 as an alternative to the Klipschorn. It offers similar performance and, unlike the Klipschorn, it does not require corner placement. (La Scala history)

The fully horn-loaded, three-way La Scala was used early on by Arkansas gubernatorial candidate Winthrop Rockefeller and now has fans like Lord of the Rings star Elijah Wood who fulfilled the prophecy of a now famous Klipsch t-shirt.

Klipsch Cornwall Made in USA

Cornwall III (Heritage Series)

Simply put, the Cornwall is the Heresy’s “big brother.” Introduced in 1959, the Cornwall was designed to serve as a bigger and more powerful version of the Heresy as (ideally) a center channel for a pair of Klipschorns. (Cornwall history)

Over the years, the Cornwall has developed its own dedicated following who can’t get enough of its three-way design and direct-radiating 15-inch woofer. Klipsch briefly discontinued the Cornwall in 1990 but quickly changed its mind after an outcry from customers that included a written petition.

Klipsch Heresy Made in USA

A Klipsch Heresy speaker at the flagship John Varvatos store in Detroit, MI.

Heresy III (Heritage Series)

The Klipsch Heresy speaker was introduced in 1957 as a center channel for a pair of Klipschorn speakers. As far as we know, it’s the first commercially-made center channel speaker. (Heresy History)

The Heresy now stands very much on it’s own. Steven Guttenberg calls the Heresy III “a rock’n’roller’s dream speaker” in Stereophile. A little Heresy is good for the soul.

Reference RF-7 II Made in USA

Reference RF-7 II speakers on the line in Hope, AR. (Photo credit: “CECAA850″ from the Klipsch Forums)

Reference RF-7 II

The RF-7 II is the flagship speaker in the popular Reference series lineup. It’s striking copper-and-black aesthetics and muscular performance make it many customers’ choice when building the ultimate home theater.

This speaker is often compared to classic American muscle cars because it’s loud, bold and freakin’ awesome.

Reference RC-64 Made in USA

Reference RC-64 II

Great home theater systems need a proper center channel and few are better than the RC-64 II that is handmade on the line in Hope. With four 6.5” Ceramatllic woofers, the RC-64 II is the most powerful center channel in the Reference series and the perfect compliment the RF-7 II floorstanding speakers.

Palladium Made in USA


The Palladium Series was an industry-redefining project that began with a vision – not a budget. Every engineering detail was meticulously pored over to ensure that this speaker was a befitting flagship speaker for the Klipsch brand. We are extremely proud to assemble these breathtaking speakers right here in the heart of America.

THX Ultra2 Made in USA

THX Ultra 2

There is an American-made option for the movie enthusiast who wants their speakers to have the highest THX certification….and it rocks. In fact, we believe that few professional theaters can match the stunning high-output, low-distortion sound that this system achieves.

Sun King Fishers Tap Room Made in USA

Klipsch Professional speakers in action at the Sun King Brewing Tap Room in Fishers, IN.

Klipsch Professional

Many of the Klipsch Professional speakers that you find in movie theaters, race tracks, restaurants, etc are made in Hope, Arkansas alongside the Heritage Series. Building the speakers in Hope allows us to quickly ship products to businesses that match their specifications.

Heritage-Inspired Speakers

The Future

Klipsch is always examining opportunities to bring more manufacturing to Hope, Arkanas. At CES, we showed off a concept for wireless towers and bookshelf monitors that combined beautiful Hope cabinetry with the technology from a Klipsch Stadium.

Do you own a Klipsch speaker that was Made in USA? Post your setup in the comments.



Klipsch Install Stories: John Varvatos

If you’ve ever seen an ad for John Varvatos, you will know that that the men’s lifestyle brand is all about rock-and-roll. From Iggy Pop to Alice Cooper to Green Day, the brand associates itself closely with rockers from multiple generations.

This attitude and tone of voice comes straight down from the brand’s namesake – John Varvatos – whose passion for music runs deep. He grew up idolizing the musicians he now features in advertisements and even has a store in the former site of the famed punk-club CBGB.

John Varvatos

When it came to designing a flagship store in his hometown of Detroit, the three-time “Menswear Designer of the Year” turned to Klipsch to fulfill his audio needs and deliver the best experience for his customers.

“Music is deeply rooted within the John Varvatos brand. Thanks to Klipsch, who placed killer speakers throughout our Detroit Store, our clients are enveloped in state-of-the-art sounds, adding to an enhanced shopping experience.”

The newest John Varvatos store is now equipped with Klipsch Heresy III speakers and Klipsch Reference subwoofers. These Klipsch Heresy speakers have exposed cabinets with a slick black finish with custom grilles that fits perfectly with the gritty design of the store’s interior. (Click here to see more photos.)

Klipsch Heresy Speakers John Varvatos Detroit

But Varvatos didn’t just turn to Heresy speakers because they are “a rock’n’roller’s dream speaker” as noted audiophile and professional reviewer Steven Guttenberg dubbed them in a Stereophile editorial.

“Back in the late 70’s when I really got into audio and discovered the difference of great sound, I saved up and bought a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers. The quality difference was incredible. They became the standard to which I have listened to quality audio ever since.”

It’s a story that’s similar to those of Klipsch fans all across the world.


Check out more Klipsch Install Stories.



Dads That Rock: Memories of Music

It is no great surprise that many of our life-long obsessions with music and great audio began with our fathers. The blog series “Dads That Rock” is an on-going Father’s Day tribute to these great men who helped inspire our passions. Cory from Paducah Home Theater (and “MetropolisLakeOutfitters” from the Klipsch forums) submitted the story below with minimal edits by the Klipsch editorial staff.

My dad (Kevin) introduced me to the world of classic rock as a boy.

We never had much money growing up, so for transportation he had to overhaul his old Dodge D-50 truck a total of four times, squeezing over 400,000 miles out of it while working a third shift. There were times when the only chance I had to see him was to walk a quarter mile down to my grandparents’ garage and hang out while he tore an engine apart.

The conversations we had usually ended up revolving around music while we listened to it. I didn’t understand much of it at the time but it makes more sense now.

While in that garage, he explained the meaning behind several Pink Floyd songs on many occasions. Any time Santana’s “Black Magic Woman” played, he would regurgitate memories about some crazy ex-girlfriend who was rumored to be a witch. He would describe in detail all the chaos that happened at Bull Island any time soemthing related to Woodstock came up since he was there.

I was even told about how my great-grandmother came from England, how she left behind a sister when she immigrated. Somehow, through this person, George Harrison of the Beatles was born and is technically my 5th cousin (I think?). Unfortunately, somebody stole the letter that explained it all.

I have no idea if it’s one true, but it’s a fun story nonetheless and his eyes light up every time he tells it.

Cory ZZ Top

Cory snapped this photo of ZZ Top.

My dad took me to my first concert at age 14, where we saw ZZ Top in their hey day. Their concerts were much different back then – trap doors, space ships, laser shows, conveyor belts, faux teleportation, etc. –really over the top. Nothing has topped it since then – it was truly a once in a lifetime experience.

For my 16th birthday, Santa brought my first subwoofers as well as a 4th edition The Loudspeaker Design Cookbook, which helped us manually design and build a fourth order tri-chambered bandpass box together for my 1988 Chevrolet Beretta. Due to the aforementioned lack of funds, the first version was the budget build from hell.

Working in an industry factory as an electrician, my dad had access to old wire. He smuggled home some discarded IBM networking wire for signal wires, some welding cable for power wires, smaller wire used as speaker wire, large capacitors to help the electrical system with dynamics and many other industrial parts like fuse boxes and terminals.

This is actually how I paid for the car itself, by stripping and recycling copper wire that was being thrown away, as copper prices weren’t what they are today so this was surprisingly pretty common. I found a [competitor] coaxial speaker in the trash and we used it as a center channel.

The first time we got it all connected after working on it for a long time, we sat there in the car in the middle of the night and listened to most of the Genesis “We Can’t Dance” album, which had recently come out and has some incredibly sweet midrange from percussion and keyboards, which sounded great on the flat Blaupunkt “honeycomb” midranges that I had. Soon afterwards we cranked up the engine and got to hear what the worst ground loop in the world sounds like, but dad got it fixed pretty quickly.

Cory Chevrolet Beretta

What we built would go on to win several trophies in halfway local International Auto Sound Challenge Association (IASCA) competitions. Overhearing a judge tell their buddies “that’s the best sounding car out here” was a big source of pride considering it was thrown away parts and Wal-Mart amps.

Plus (and most importantly), my dad and I worked on it together.

More than anything, my dad showed me what music could do to you emotionally. That really stuck with me, even nearly 30 years after hearing some of those stories in that garage.

We never had nice expensive equipment, but the memories associated with the music are worth much more than that.

Cory Doobie Brothers


Do you have a story about your dad that rocks, music and/or Klipsch speakers? Post it in the comments below and/or email it to alex.leopold@klipsch.com


Dads That Rock: Heresy Is Good for the Soul

It is no great surprise that many of our life-long obsessions with music and great audio began with our fathers. The blog series “Dads That Rock” is an on-going Father’s Day tribute to these great men who helped inspire our passions. “JimJimbo” from the Klipsch Forums submitted the story below with minimal edits by the Klipsch editorial staff.

My mom and dad were both raised in the 1930’s and 1940’s and loved all kinds of music. They had very eclectic tastes from big band to Kingston Trio folk, Herb Alpert, Sinatra, Elvis, Beatles and even some light rock.

We lived in Grand Rapids, Michigan at the time. Around 1972 my dad bought a huge, gorgeous walnut console stereo with a turntable and AM/FM tuner. He was very proud of it and the console was the star of our living room.

My dad was a sales manager for a large automotive company and there were quite a few parties that took place at our home for clients and friends. The music was always playing and turned up!

Soon after, in 1974, I joined the Navy and was sent to San Diego for boot camp. Upon completion, we were let loose in town and I happened to spot a stereo shop there (the name escapes me).

I went in and spent some time listening to a few sets of speakers, receivers and amplifiers. I was immediately taken with a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers that I heard.

With the money I had saved during my time in boot camp, I purchased the Heresy speakers and had them shipped home to Grand Rapids. I went home on leave before my next assignment and the Heresy speakers were there waiting.

I had to find something to power them, so a friend loaned me a cool Sansui integrated amp. I think it was an AU-777 and a decent turntable. The system went down to the basement and for the next week or so lots of Hendrix, Traffic, Allman Brothers and Clapton were played.

My dad came down a couple of times to ask me to turn it down, but when he reached the bottom of the stairs and heard the stunning difference between his precious console and the Heresy system, he stayed for a while and listened.

I went off to Submarine school and then to a boat in Pearl Harbor for a year or so. When I returned on leave the next time to my parents home, guess which system was in the living room and which was in the basement?

This was the beginning of my love for Klipsch.


Do you have a story about your dad that rocks and his Klipsch speakers? Post it in the comments below and/or email it to alex.leopold@klipsch.com

Dads That Rock: Klipsch Fortes in the Family

It is no great surprise that many of our life-long obsessions with music and great audio began with our fathers. The blog series “Dads That Rock” is an on-going Father’s Day tribute to these great men who helped inspire our passions. Matt Milligan submitted the story below with minimal edits by the Klipsch editorial staff.

Back in 1985 or 1986 during his junior year at the Naval Academy my dad he went around to many high-end audio stores in the Washington DC area and tested multiple speakers before deciding on Klipsch. He specifically remembers using the Star Wars theme track album to test the speakers. He said the sound and physical appeal (wood cabinets) of the speakers were both “phenomenal.”

He knew the Klipsch Forte speakers were horn loaded and that intrigued him, but other than that he did not know much about them.

My dad had not told me much about the speakers before 2013. I only knew that there were speakers in big boxes in the garage. Then after about three months of asking to see them and being denied because he was to busy with work, I just took them out of the garage one day while he was out running errands.

A good call on my part because they haven’t gone back in the garage since.

Matt Milligan Klipsch Forte KG1

The album on top of the shelf between the KG1’s is a Journey album autographed buy Neil Schon and Steve Smith. The Onkyo amplifier, tune, cd player and turntable are all the same ones my dad purchased. The stereo set on the bottom is the one I bought for my dorm room. I bought the KG1’s on Craigslist before college started for $100, and they sound fantastic. They were a real steal.

I still listen to records with him occasionally. Fortunately, he kept all of his 33’s including AC/DC, Led Zeppelin and others from when he was a kid. He also still has mixed tapes he made in college that I listen too, they include a lot of 80’s bands, Fine Young Cannibals, The The, Violent Femmes, etc…

Personally I love the Forte speakers and I conducted my own experiment in which I turned my amplifier up to volume level 25/40. I then proceeded to walk 14 houses down my street before I couldn’t hear the speakers anymore – no joke!

I can’t speak highly enough of the Fortes. Any time I hear someone talking about or thinking of buying speakers, Klipsch is the first name I bring into the conversation. I recommend the brand to literally everyone I meet.

When I started at the California Maritime Academy, I left the Fortes at my house, but I bought the Klipsch KG1’s on Craigslist specifically for my dorm room. They are a convenient size, yet even with the KG1’s I am able to get into trouble.

My friends have also learned to love Klipsch speakers. A lot of my friends listen to more hip-hop/rap than I do (I guess I’m bit of an old soul) and they love it when I bring them over, turn up the bass and crank the volume up. Objects will literally vibrate off of the shelves in my room.

I still have yet to blow a woman’s clothes off though, haha. I have also gotten in trouble with the RA’s (FROM THE FLOOR BELOW ME!) a few times for playing the music to loud.

I couldn’t even imagine having the Fortes at school with me, but I do plan on bringing them with me my sophomore year. Look out.


Do you have a story about your dad that rocks and his Klipsch speakers? Post it in the comments below and/or email it to alex.leopold@klipsch.com