Tag Archives: soundbars

Buying a Sound Bar for Your TV? Read This First.

Sound bars owe their existence to flat-panel TVs. Sure, those skinny screens produce a crystal-clear picture. But their tiny built-in speakers can’t even reproduce dialogue clearly, much less deliver convincing explosions, car crashes and all the other mayhem that keeps us riveted by our favorite movies and TV shows.

TV speakers are not only undersized and under-powered, they’re almost always aimed in the wrong direction, firing sound downward or toward the wall behind the TV. It’s no wonder everything comes out indistinct and out-of-focus.

So the goal of the sound bar is to provide a sonic experience that more closely matches the TV’s lifelike picture. Equipment makers use a variety of methods to achieve that goal, and pretty much any sound bar you choose is going to sound better than your TV’s speakers. A lot better.

Sound bars have exploded in popularity in recent years, and the number of models has likewise exploded. So we’ve put together this buying guide to help you quickly figure out what flavor of sound bar might work best for you.

Klipsch Reference R-4B Design

What is a sound bar?

A sound bar is an all-in-one speaker system that delivers high-quality TV sound without requiring the space, complexity and expense of a home theater receiver and surround sound speaker setup. A sound bar’s long, slender cabinet contains two or more speakers, and may provide either stereo or surround sound. Some sound bars come with a separate subwoofer for producing deep bass, which adds impact to movie soundtracks and music.

Nearly all sound bars you’ll run across are a self-powered or “active” – that is, they have their own built-in amplifiers. But there is a vanishing breed of sound bars designed to be connected to and powered by a receiver. These non-powered or “passive” sound bars lack another major advantage of active models: easy setup and operation. This article covers only self-powered sound bars, since that’s what 99.9% of folks are looking for.

When shopping, you’ll run across sound bars from nearly every audio company, as well as most TV makers. A sound bar made by the same company that built your TV may be a perfect match cosmetically, or offer other compatibility benefits. But for pure sound quality, you’ll probably do better with a model from a company whose main focus is audio gear.

Where do you plan to put it?

Knowing where you’re going to place your sound bar will immediately simplify your decision and narrow down your choices. There are two basic options. If your TV is hanging on the wall you can mount the sound bar right below it for a neat, uncluttered look. If you’re going this route, you’ll want to consider how you’ll hide the power cord and connection cable.

On the other hand, if your TV sits on a stand or cabinet, you can set the sound bar in front of the TV. In that case you’ll want to measure your stand and your TV’s base to be sure the sound bar won’t stick out from the stand at all.

You should also measure the space between the top of your stand and the bottom of your TV screen, to make sure the sound bar doesn’t block any of the screen. Some sound bars can be positioned either with the speakers facing forward, or laying flat with the speakers facing up, for just this reason.

Sound bars come in a wide range of sizes, from barely a foot wide to nearly five feet long. The right size bar for you will depend on the size of your room, the size of your TV, and your personal preferences.

If you plan to do at least some of your shopping in actual brick-and-mortar stores, pull out your phone and snap a few pics of your TV before you head out the door. That way when you’re comparing models at the local big box, you can check those photos and have get a better idea of how different sound bars will look in your home.

Klipsch Reference R-4B Wireless Subwoofer

What about a subwoofer?

If you think you might want a sound bar with an accompanying subwoofer, that might limit your placement options a bit, but probably less than you’d expect. That’s because nearly all of these subwoofers are wireless. That is, they receive the audio signal wirelessly from the sound bar, so you needn’t connect any cables between the sound bar and the subwoofer. But you will need to plug the sub into a wall outlet for power.

Also, the low frequencies that subs produce are difficult for our ears to locate, so you can usually position the sub almost anywhere in the room and still have it blend well sonically with the sound bar. Put it next to your sofa or tuck it in a corner behind a potted palm.

Sound bar or sound base?

So far, we’ve been talking about sound bars that really do have the long, thin shape of a bar. But there’s another type: the platform-style sound bar, also sometimes called a sound base. This wide, low-profile design sits under your TV and supports it. Sound bases have specially reinforced cabinets that are extra-sturdy. If you’re considering this type, check the specs to make sure it can support the weight of your TV. And make sure the sound base is wider than your TV’s base.

A sound base might be your best bet if there isn’t much vertical space between the bottom of your TV screen and the top of your stand. It’s also a smart choice if you want full-range sound without a separate subwoofer. Sound bases have two advantages that help them produce surprisingly full sound. They can use bigger speakers, plus the cabinets are much larger, giving the speakers “room to breathe” so they can produce more bass.

Stereo or surround sound?
It’s worth repeating that any sound bar is going to sound way better than your TV. Basic sound bars tend to be stereo designs that reproduce the same right and left channel audio information as your TV. But they sound much bigger thanks to larger speakers powered by amplifiers with real oomph.

You’ll also run across systems with two speakers, or even three speakers in a left/right/center configuration, that can go beyond the limitations of stereo. These sound bars may use Dolby Digital processing to anchor the dialogue to the TV screen and place sounds so that you get a broader front soundstage with more precise placement of sound effects.

Then there are the multichannel sound bars that mimic the realistic, wraparound sound of a full-on, multi-speaker surround sound system. They typically are labeled 5.1 or 7.1 systems, with discrete sounds assigned to each channel to create a three-dimensional soundfield. A few sound bars use special “beam-type” speakers to bounce sound off your walls, tricking your ears into thinking there are speakers all around you.

If you’re a “cord-cutter” who relies on your TV’s built-in tuner to pick up over-the-air TV signals, and/or smart TV apps to watch streaming services like Netflix, you’ll want a sound bar with Dolby Digital decoding. Most recent TVs will pass a Dolby Digital signal to your sound bar when you’re watching an internal source – those that aren’t external components. We’ll talk more about this in the connections section.

Hearing voices

Just getting sound that’s louder and fuller than your TV’s speakers is pretty exciting, but most sound bars have a few other audio tricks up their sleeves. Actors’ voices will naturally sound much clearer thanks to bigger and better speakers, but many sound bars add dialogue enhancement features that make voices louder still and bring them forward in the mix.

And here’s something we’ve probably all experienced: Watching TV at a comfortable volume level, then suddenly being blasted off the couch when a commercial comes on. Most sound bars now include technology to ensure that commercials aren’t louder than show soundtracks. Another common feature is a “late night” mode that reduces volume peaks in the program, making it less likely that you’ll disturb someone sleeping in a nearby room.

Sound bars can make great music players, too

With the popularity of wireless music playback it’s not surprising that many sound bars now offer that capability. Built-in Bluetooth® lets you stream music easily from your smartphone, tablet, or Bluetooth-capable computer. It works with the music stored on your phone as well as your favorite streaming music apps (like Spotify®). And Bluetooth is the wireless music standard these days – nearly all iOS®, Android®, and Windows® phones and tablets have built-in Bluetooth.

Some sound bars even have Wi-Fi® capability for quick access to online streaming services as well as your personal digital music library. Wi-Fi isn’t as goof-proof to connect as Bluetooth, but some sound bars include Wi-Fi-based wireless audio systems like Play-Fi, which let you set up a multi-room sound system so you can seamlessly play music all over the house. A sound bar might also have a USB input, so you can load up a thumb drive with your favorite tunes, leave it plugged in, and listen to them anytime.

Making the right connections

When choosing a sound bar, be sure you pick one with the right connections for your TV and other components. There are two basic ways to hook up a sound bar to your system. The most common way is to use your TV as a switching hub: you connect your Blu-ray player, cable or satellite box, and game console to your TV, then send the audio out from your TV to the sound bar.

This is a simple approach that lets you simultaneously switch the audio and video signals when you switch inputs on your TV. Typically, you’ll make a digital audio connection between your TV and sound bar – either optical or HDMI – in order to be able to enjoy surround sound from sources that offer it. This is a particularly good way to go if you bought your TV in 2015. That’s when TV makers decided to build true Dolby Digital pass-through into their TVs, allowing connected components like Blu-ray players to send surround sound audio through the TV and on to a receiver or sound bar.

Prior to 2015, if you used your TV as a switcher, the TV would convert any incoming audio to a two-channel PCM signal. That’s still playable by sound bars, and it sounds good, but it’s stereo, not surround. By the way, this is often the answer if you’re getting a picture but no sound from a connected source. Just go into the TV’s menu and you should find an audio setting for either PCM or Dolby Digital.

Every HDTV and 4K TV has an optical digital output, and so does nearly every sound bar. This connection is second only to HDMI as a way of getting high-quality sound from your TV to a sound bar. And speaking of HDMI, a growing number of sound bars include HDMI connections, which means you could connect your Blu-ray player or high-def cable box directly to the sound bar.

Staying in control

Once your sound bar is hooked up and set up, you can usually use your TV remote to control its volume. Most TV and cable or satellite remotes can be programmed to control a sound bar, or the sound bar can learn your TV’s commands. Most sound bars include at least a basic remote control, and often there are free remote apps that let you use your smartphone or tablet as a remote.

Wrapping up

Initially developed as a reaction to wimpy TV sound, sound bars have taken on a life of their own, providing a user-friendly combination of performance, convenience, and value. With so many models to choose from, everyone should be able to find a model that suits their preferences and pocketbook.

3 Times a Sound Bar is Better Than Surround Sound

We know what you’re thinking. “Blasphemy! A soundbar can never be better than a surround sound system!”

You’re right. In a perfect world, everyone has a kick-ass 5.1+ surround sound system rattling the windows and pissing off the neighbors every night.

That being said, we are a realistic bunch and there are specific situations where a soundbar is the ideal solution for people looking to upgrade their TV’s crappy built-in speakers.

Thankfully, Klipsch boasts a family of sound bars that are not only an upgrade from any built-in TV speakers but also out-perform the competition. We feel strongly that these are not “just soundbars.”

Here are three situations, where a soundbar is indeed the better solution over a surround sound system

FINANCIALLY SPEAKING

Klipsch speakers are a serious investment. We respect and appreciate consumers’ willingness to spend their hard earned money on our speakers. Fortunately, Klipsch speakers do amortize over time due to their durability and timeless sound.

Of course, it is still a rather large up-front cost, especially if you consider the additional costs of an AV receiver, speaker wire and labor (if you are hiring someone to install it into the walls). That’s where a soundbar comes in.

The Klipsch lineup of Reference sound bars is reasonably priced and provides a multitude of options that not only better your TV’s built-in speakers but also crush the competition. The most recent addition is the Reference R-4B soundbar, which comes in at $399 in the United States, making it an excellent value for any home.

Plus, if you are able to upgrade to a full-blown 5.1+ surround sound system, you can always just move the soundbar to another room!

NO WIRES ALLOWED

Almost everyone hates wires. They can be unsightly with your décor or they may even become a chew toy for your curious cat. Heck, they could even be unsafe if you run them through the middle of the floor, acting as a trip wire.

Klipsch Reference soundbars keep clutter to a minimum and each comes with a wireless subwoofer, which is great because you don’t have to run a subwoofer cable. (Click here to learn where you should place your subwoofer.)

NO SPACE FOR BIG SPEAKERS

There are a couple reasons where space becomes an issue for a surround sound system. We are not all so fortunate to be able to plop giant floorstanding speakers wherever we desire.

First of all, you might simply have too many things and be unable to make the adequate floor or wall space required for separate Klipsch speakers. The second reason is that the room where you have the speakers may not be setup very well for a proper surround sound system. For example, if the room is very narrow, you are not going to get much stereo separation from the front speakers if there’s even any space to the left and right of the television.

Have questions about whether you should get a Klipsch Reference soundbar or to go with a surround sound system? Post in the comments below!

3 Video Games That Have Killer Sound

What sets video games apart from listening to recorded music and movies is the organic, three-dimensional experience – and no two gaming experiences are identical. Everything from the echo of the character’s footsteps in a hall to a grenade detonating off in the distance make the listening experience of video games unique and engaging.

A resounding problem that we have encountered and continue to hear from our customers is that the default speakers in computers, TVs and cheap gaming headsets are not capable of capturing the wide range of ear tingling sounds that today’s game developers are spending time and money to deliver. Gaming soundtracks have become (and are continuing to become) a transformative part of the addictive gaming experience.

We asked our biggest gamers at Klipsch HQ to outline three games that have the range, detail and quality of sound that are known to capture their audiences. If you know of others you like please let us know in the comments section.

So crank up your Reference home theater system, sound bar or KG-300 gaming headset and double tap into these games with kickass sound:

Mass Effect

By David Wilkes – Klipsch Acoustics & Electronics Engineer

The sound quality of Mass Effect evolved with each game making it one of the best video game soundscapes ever.

 

For most games, every single aspect plays an equal role in the game’s enjoyment factor. The sound quality of a video game is, in my opinion, the most important by far. Environmental sounds, weapon feedback, even nuances in voices can make or break a game experience.

With that criteria in mind, I feel only one game series has far surpassed the status quo in every regard: Mass Effect. Mass Effect 1 (ME1) started the trend with unbelievable environmental effects: you can sense that you’re in an enormous open courtyard, clinging for life in a blizzard, on a spaceship hurling through space or that you’re on an uncharted world with minimal atmosphere, which normally would give you very little feedback. In ME1, they’ve been able to create the sound of…absence.

However, ME2 and ME3 took a great thing and made it extraordinary. Both games use an updated sound engine compared to ME1, so the aural experience is now off the charts. The ambient effects in both games give every single “space” a distinct feel.  Each alien race in the game, particularly English speaking ones, has a specific trait which only high resolution systems can reproduce. Said nuances quickly become indicative of that race’s signature demeanor. One in particular sounds very soft with a pleasant reverb so you associate them with kindness. Another has a low frequency metallic undertone so immediately you learn they are business first, kindness never.

For the ultimate experience of what video game audio can be, the first chapter of the final mission of ME3 is your ticket. It’s worth playing through the entire series (yes, you read that right) just to see how far gaming has come.

Final Fantasy

By Greg “Doom” Niehaus – Klipsch Quality Analyst

Final Fantasy has one of the best cinematic soundtracks of any video game series.

 

When I think about game audio that has had an impact on me, I tend to lean heavily toward the Final Fantasy series. While it is difficult to compare the overall game audio of the series to some of the more recent games we have seen, one element outshines even the most meticulously polished audio in any series: the music. Final Fantasy has long had a tradition of using its fantastic music to set the tone of the story. Even the magnitude of individual encounters will often be greatly enhanced by the background music used during battle.

The first memory I have of a truly cinematic experience in a video game was in Final Fantasy VII. Not because of the three dimensional graphics that were new to the series, but because of the score. Going back and listening to the original game music, I can still feel the same energy and emotions that I encountered when first playing through the game. Even now when I play the most recent Final Fantasy MMO (FFXIV), I have moments where the music immediately triggers a change in mood. Where in one instant I was calmly traversing the world, the music generated by an encounter ensures that I am prepared to either fight or flee in the next instant.

While some may view this as a fan being a fan, or perhaps simple nostalgia, a lot of the world seems to agree that it is not. Even disregarding critical praise, it is possible to find elements of the series influence in the physical world. Most gamers can instantly recognize the Final Fantasy “Victory Fanfare” (I also happen to use it as my ringtone). In a more surprising example, the 2004 Olympic Women’s Synchronized Duo Alison Bartosik and Anna Kozlova used music from Final Fantasy VIII for their routine (they won bronze).

The name Final Fantasy was chosen for the first in the series because the studio making it feared that it may be their last game. A couple decades later it is rightfully still one of the biggest franchises in existence. I would like to think that this is due at least in part, to the impact of its music on the players.

Bioshock

By Andrew Doerr – Klipsch Acoustics Engineer

Bioshock’s ability to give an immersive soundstage through it’s environment and charters is top-notch.

 

Of all the forms of entertainment available to the modern consumer, video games have a distinct advantage in one particular aspect: immersion. However, just because the gaming medium has this capability to immerse the player doesn’t mean all games excel at it.  Occasionally you will find a series of games that have mastered this ability – and Bioshock is one of those series.

Fully immersing a player in an artificial world demands perfection in all facets of video game design. The obvious elements are graphics, gameplay, storyline, level design and so on.  However, the one aspect that is occasionally overlooked is audio. And interestingly enough, it is the audio that can make or break that coveted immersive feeling. Bioshock’s sound design has been carefully crafted so that you are never pulled out of the experience. There are two key elements of immersive sound that Bioshock does well and each has an underlying theme.

First, the environment. The first two Bioshock games in the series are set in an underwater city – making for a difficult soundstage for the gaming developers to design. The creaking of buildings being strained by ocean currents, the dripping of water leaking in and somehow they even portrayed the immense weight of all that water above you in the eerie soundtracks and ambience. It’s not just cheesy water effects, it’s a well thought out sonic environment that never lets you forget you are underwater. And even though no such place exists, you believe that it does through the creative and accurate sounds.

Bioshock Infinite (the third Bioshock game) takes place in a city floating up in the sky and the same theory applies – constant wind and strange, open echoes of gunshots and slamming doors.  The game never lets you forget you are not on solid ground.  Again, no such place exists, but for a few hours you believe it and that’s the power of immersion.

Second, the characters. Many of Bioshock’s characters have magical powers and unrealistic feats of strength. And with a good sound design you believe that these creatures are real – and not only real but terrifying too.

The best example is Big Daddy from the first Bioshock game. Even though this beast resembles nothing human, the essence that this creature once were human is hidden in the sounds it makes. It’s chilling but effective, drawing from what we can relate to.

That’s not all, these enemies are extremely tough and the sound they make when moving and attacking is so haunting that you dread the moment you realize you have to fight one.

Big Daddy from Bioshock - another reason why it's in our top games with killer sound - The Klipsch Joint

Big Daddy from Bioshock – just another reason why it’s in our top video games with killer sound

So how does this make a difference? To me, with a detailed sound design, Bioshock has made the imaginary a reality because for the duration of the game you believe that an underwater city does exist, that these monsters are real and the world you are in is spiraling out of control.  And that is successful immersion.

4 Things to Know Before Buying a Sound Bar

It’s no secret that the built-in speakers in most flat-panel TVs are less than stellar. But while installing a surround sound system can transform your living room into a mini home theater, some may be reluctant to pull the trigger. Enter the sound bar – the perfect upgrade to your TV’s default speakers. If chosen wisely, they can pack a big punch. In fact, this compact piece of equipment can majorly improve dialogue clarity while providing more vibrant, full-range sound. The kicker is that they take up minimal space and are designed to flow with modern décor.

With all the available options out there, shopping for a sound bar can be slightly overwhelming. Luckily, we’ve done your homework for you. Check out the way we’ve sized up the most important things to know before purchasing a sound bar. (You’ll thank us later.)

1. Get clear about what you want

Sound bars come in all different shapes and sizes. Some can be mounted directly onto the wall, while others are made to sit beneath your TV or rest right on top of your entertainment stand. Part of choosing the best sound bar for your needs involves taking measurements of your space. Nothing’s worse than unpacking an awesome piece of equipment only to find that it doesn’t suit with your TV and stand. Our advice? Measure the length, width and depth of your flat-panel TV and stand before shopping for a sound bar. Then use this info to help guide your search.

2. Understand the difference between active vs. passive sound bars

Sound bars are broken down as being either active or passive. Each one comes with its own unique set of perks. Active sound bars tout an all-in-one setup. This means that the speakers, amplifiers and the bits that process killer surround sound are all housed in one sleek bar. This lends itself to a more streamlined, compact look. Setup is also a cinch for active sound bars, which allow for super simple plug-and-play connectivity. If it’s clean installation and great sound quality you’re after, an active system might be the better fit for you.

Passive sound bars are different because they do not come equipped with built-in power amps. As a result, they require a separate amplifier or receiver and will need speaker wires running to either. An upside is that this provides ultra-crisp sound. The setup may be a bit more involved, but the end result also gives you more control to play around with different crossover settings and the ability to connect to more sources.

Here’s an example of how easy our R-10B  active sound bar is to setup:

Klipsch Educational Films: R-10B Setup and Enjoyment

 

3. Look for Bluetooth connectivity

When shopping around, check to see if the sound bars you’re deciding between come with Bluetooth connectivity. Is it a deal breaker? Not necessarily, but having the ease of playing your favorite tunes straight off your smartphone or tablet is pretty sweet. It also allows you to stream music straight from your computer, a particularly attractive perk for get-togethers and dinner parties. The best part is that pairing your sound bar with your audio devices is a relatively simple process.

4. Does a subwoofer make a difference?

Take measurments of the height, width and depth where your soundbar will go. - The Klipsch Joint

It’s important to take measurements of the height, width and depth where your sound bar will go.

If you want your sound system to vibrate with deep, intense hums, and get the full effect from your movie explosion scenes, a subwoofer can make all the difference. It’s an external device, but the cool thing is that the newer ones are sleek, discreet and not ginormous. Some sound bars come packaged with a subwoofer in the box.

There are also a lot of wireless subwoofer options out there to make the setup process less cumbersome. (Check out the Klipsch R-10B and R-20B sound bars with wireless subwoofers included.) At the end of the day, a subwoofer won’t make or break a sound bar system. But you’re favorite action films will sound a hell of a lot cooler with that added bass.

And if you need help placing a subwoofer? Read, “Where to Put a Subwoofer: 3 Tips,” or if you’re simply deciding between a sound bar and a full theater system, read “Sound bar vs. Surround Sound” to get an overview of the two.

What sound bar or sound system do you have in your home or hope to have in the future?

Best Home Theater Speaker Systems: 4 Things to Know

If you’re wanting better sound quality from your entertainment system, chances are you need to add a home theater system. The truth is that even the best high-def TVs are seriously lacking when it comes to speaker capability since they’ve become so slim over time. At the end of the day, they simply can’t deliver the clarity of voice in the softest whisper, or those deep, explosive lows that’ll bring your favorite action movies to life. The same goes for the full-range sound effects that only surround sound speakers can deliver.

Before deciding on which home theater speaker system is right for you, here are four things to consider:

1. The Perks of All-In-One Setups

Some of the best home theater speaker systems are considered “in the box” setups. All this means is that the manufacturer has taken the time to pre-package the essential equipment you really need. A good system will include a pair of floorstanding speakers or bookshelf speakers, a center channel speaker, two rear surround sound speakers and a subwoofer. This system set up is also known as a 5.1 system (five speakers and one subwoofer). As you’d expect, higher quality systems typically include two additional speakers for superior surround effects (making it a 7.1 system). Perhaps the biggest benefit of an all-in-one setup is convenience – simply make one purchase and you’re done. Going the pre-packaged route is also easier to install and usually more cost effective than buying pieces individually. The good news is that many of the best in the box setups are crafted with furniture aesthetics in mind, so your system won’t be an eyesore. If you need help choosing speakers, check out the Klipsch Reference Speaker Selector.

2. Building Your Own System

While a pre-packaged setup is ideal for some, others may prefer to build their own system from the ground up. (We’re looking at you, audiophiles.) It may be a bit more involved, but taking a do-it-yourself approach comes with some perks. For starters, you can tailor your system to meet your individual needs. One hardcore movie buff may be more choosy about their center channel speaker, for example. But another music lover might just be looking to customize their entertainment center with a pair of killer floorstanding speakers. Building your own system a la carte gives you the freedom to mix and match products as you see fit.

3. Understand the System Layout

Klipsch Home Theater Systems

Center speaker should be place directly under the TV screen and facing listeners. However, you can get creative with your subwoofer placement.

Before choosing your home theater speaker system, take a minute to assess your living room. In order to optimize your new system’s sound quality, it’s important to understand how to physically lay it all out. The center channel speaker should be placed right below or above your TV screen and positioned to face listeners. If you choose to position it on a stand, rest the speaker’s edge on the end of the stand. This will help prevent dialogue from sounding wonky. The floorstanding/bookshelf speakers should then be positioned on either side of the TV (at least six feet apart). Just be sure to keep them at an equal distance from the screen for the best sound delivery. As for the surround speakers, place these guys slightly above and behind the viewing position – about three feet above the listeners’ heads should do it. They should also be placed equally on each side. Things are a little more flexible when it comes to the subwoofer. While corners make for a good location, feel free to give it a try along a wall or next to a front speaker. If you haven’t already, check out our Klipsch WA-2 Kit that makes your subwoofer wireless, allowing more flexibility to find the perfect spot for your subwoofer.

4. A Killer Sound Bar Might Be All You Need

A sound bar, while not as powerful as a full-out surround sound system, still represents a step up from your TV’s default speakers. For the electronically challenged, a sound bar’s super simple installation is enough of a draw. What’s more is that they actually do produce pretty killer sound in a compact, single-speaker device (which is perfect for small spaces, by the way). For one thing, the right sound bar can deliver strong virtual sound. What’s that, you ask? It basically simulates surround sound. A benefit to this system is that it’s sleek, not bulky and comes with minimal wires. If you snag one with Bluetooth connectivity, it’ll also seamlessly play your favorite music right from your smartphone, tablet or computer. Despite it’s crowd-pleasing features, some may prefer to add a subwoofer to their soundbar to add low bass frequencies. Plus, a sound bar’s easy plug and play function does not limit the system to your living room’s home theater setup. You can easily move it to the bedroom, kitchen or covered porch. Check out our Klipsch R-10B and R-20B models.

Tell us how you plan to or have set up your home theater speaker system in the comments section below. We’d love to see some pics too!