Tag Archives: jim hunter

Good Poop: Joe Edwin Holland

Legendary drummer Joseph “Joe” Holland has a unique and colorful origin and story, to the say the least. His career has been a string of interesting stories, celebrity encounters and time spent with Paul W. Klipsch (PWK). Let’s start from the beginning…

Joe was born November 2, 1927 in Shreveport, Louisiana. He attended Centenary College in Shreveport, as well as Louisiana Tech in Ruston, LA, and Texas Western in El Paso, TX (now UT El Paso).

Joe began drumming all the way back in grade school. In those days, the Shreveport schools did not have a junior high. Elementary graduates went directly to high school. There was a push to prepare these elementary students for high school music programs. Joe’s first music teacher was a type of “circuit teacher” – one that makes the rounds. He had just graduated from college and he admitted to Joe “I don’t know anything about drums at all, about how to play, but I know how to teach it.” He gave Joe a book and told him: “Do what it says here and I’ll be back next week and check on you.”

Joe practiced from the book’s instructions the whole week, and when the teacher came back, Joe had learned a great deal. Joe continued the year in this manner very successfully. There were three levels of bands in high school. Joe was admitted to the A level.

Joe’s first brush with celebrity occurred when he was only 10 years old. His father was a builder and built their family home on Scoville Court. Across the street, on Dalzell, lived “Bubba” Broyles, owner of a profitable music store. It was the gathering place for local and transient musicians. He had a fine home and also owned the house next door, which he would occasionally offer to hard-up musicians who needed a place to stay.

Pud Brown, a tenor sax man of some repute, was there at the time, and he was a close friend of Louis Armstrong. Louis was having trouble dealing with threats from the owner of a Chicago nightclub. It seems that Louis had received a better offer from another club and gave the owner his two-week’s notice. He called his old buddy, Pud Brown, and was invited to Shreveport to use the “sleepin’ porch” until things cooled down. Bubba gave his OK and Louis felt safe there.

Joe said, “I awoke to the sound of Louis’ trumpet and followed the sound to the sleepin’ porch. There sat Satchmo’ himself, smiling and playing his horn.” Of course “Jim Crow” was the order of the day in the Deep South, but Louis felt safe there because Bubba and Pud were his friends. Joe continued, “I had recently seen him in a movie short featuring Louis and his band, and I was fascinated by the man. He played for me and soon there were half-a-dozen other kids lined up at the door, equally wide-eyed. Bubba came over to get Louis and take him down to his store in the entrance of the Inn Hotel. I spent the afternoon listening and talking to Louis. I kept calling him Lou-ee until he corrected me, saying, “Joe, mah name, spelled L-O-U-I-S, not L-O-U-E-E! Say it: Lou-ISS.”

I have forever after called him LouISS. The last time I saw Louis, he and his band were featured in a performance at Shreveport’s Municipal Auditorium. He had “Big Sid” Catlett, one of our finest, playing drums. Sid played a fabulous drum solo and dedicated it to me, a 14-year-old kid with tears in his eyes.”

World War II was only months away when Joe got a job in Shreveport playing in a “low-down honky-tonk band.” His parents never paid much attention to his musical activities and knew nothing of his job, which paid $100.00 a week. At the time, this was more than many executives in Shreveport made. Joe saved his money and opened a bank account, which soon grew into the thousands.

Riding home on a city bus one afternoon, Joe noticed a new Packard in front of a house with a sign on the windshield: “Buy this car for $300.00, I have been drafted into the army, Must Sell.” Joe hopped off the bus, rang the doorbell, looked at the car, drove it around the block and paid $300 cash.

His parents were astonished when he drove the car home and they asked him where the money came from. They both drove “mere Dodges.” This also prompted his mother to find a good, tough military academy. Schools with a military mission were becoming popular because of the looming certainty of war.

They decided on a military school in Gulfport, MS. When the family car arrived, a sign greeted them: “Send us the boy and we will return you the man.” It proved to be the low point in Joe’s life. He said it was like being in jail with a bunch of little boys from Mississippi, all being treated like prisoners. It even involved hazing from upper classmen that escalated. Joe credits the presence of his drums for “saving his life” and sanity. After a year or so, around 16 years of age, he “escaped in broad daylight” by taking a bus about 60 miles to New Orleans. He went straight to the musician’s union, signed up and had a job offer in a matter of hours. They kept him busy with good jobs that paid well and put him in association with a variety of celebrities.

These celebrities included Rosemary Clooney, Earl “Fatha” Hines and Candy Candido. The latter was a comic personality who had done many voice-overs, including work in the movie “The Wizard of Oz.” After this months-long tour concluded, the union recommended Joe to an all-girl band that had lost its drummer.

Mickey Stevens was the leader of the ten-member group. In order to maintain its all-girl status, the press releases said “All girl band. Featuring Joe Holland on drums.” “We worked well together,” said Joe, “We had a great time playing fancy resort hotels in Mississippi, Alabama and Florida before Mickey found a fine female drummer.”

After their tearful goodbyes, Joe moved on to a luxury hotel in Kansas City for the drum spot in a Mickey Mouse Band. Translation: very corny music but even higher pay scales, plus room and board were on the house! Just for kicks, he dropped in on some of Kansas City’s top jazz clubs.

Joe got to sit in with the likes of Count Basie, Earl Hines and many other greats of the day. However, he would not be able to work with black musicians again until his army days. That would come in 1957, the night after the 101st Airborne’s occupation of Central High School in Little Rock. It was the night he met the great Art Porter Sr. at a club in downtown Little Rock.

Joe Holland v01Joe will never forget the feeling of working with such a great jazz personality. “Art should have been an internationally known pianist, but he did not want to leave Little Rock and his children,” said Joe. His son, Art Porter, Jr. became known internationally for his skill with the alto saxophone.

One of his early jobs in 1944 was in a “hillbilly band” for Jimmie Davis’ run for Louisiana governor. Joe says it was just by luck that Davis secured the “world’s greatest guitarist,” Snoozer Quinn. Joe and Snoozer became personal friends and worked together several times. Snoozer taught Joe one of his greatest lessons, how to integrate his skills with other band members. They continued playing Davis’ rallies right up to a successful election.

As soon as he was ensconced in office, Governor Davis left his advisors in charge while he made a beeline to Hollywood, where he starred in some of the worst movies ever made. There were two other notable musicians in the Jimmie Davis Band: brothers Hoke and Paul Rice. They wrote one of the greatest country music songs of all time, “You Are My Sunshine.” This beautiful, sentimental ballad was shopped around to top country singers of the day, but no one recorded it. The boys needed money so badly that they sold the song to Jimmie Davis for a mere twenty-five dollars!

The rest, as they say, is history.

Davis recorded the tune and both he and the song became instant hits, selling in the hundreds of thousands. Davis listed himself as the composer of the song and wouldn’t pay anything more to the Rice brothers.

“In 1946, just before I left New Orleans I got to spend five days working with The Three Stooges when they were booked into the St. Charles Theatre. Curly had had a stroke, Moe was worn out and Larry Fine had been cheated out of most of the money he was due from the movie company they worked for.

They did very little hitting and spent most of their time on stage singing! They were very good at that. I was on stage with them, using the bass drum pedal to enliven their stomping around on stage and providing sound effects with Korean temple blocks to provide sound for what little hitting they did do. Just a few months later I saw Curly’s obit in the paper,” Joe said.

In 1960, Joe found himself working in another “colorful” Louisiana governor’s race. This time it was with Earl Long. Earl had carried on an embarrassing tryst with a stripper named Blaze Starr. The band didn’t see much of Ol’ Earl. The routine was to get to the dusty towns first, set up on the rail freight platform, play and draw a crowd.  As soon as they saw the white Chevy sedan they’d load up and move on to the next town. Joe said, “These things started mid-morning and continued until around 5 pm. The old boy was a trooper, as long as he had his glass of “amber colored liquid.”

In 1967, Joe broke with his tradition of Louisiana governor’s races and worked with the future governor of Arkansas, Winthrop Rockefeller. This was Rockefeller’ third and most difficult run. Joe provided the musical background for all of his commercials and 33 rallies around the state. Johnny Cash and Cal Perkins appeared at many of those rallies. On several occasions when Johnny’s drummer failed to show up, guess who sat in? Much later, in 1980, Joe worked with Frank White in his campaign that unseated Bill Clinton as governor of Arkansas. Initially, Frank was still wearing his tired plaid “country boy” suits and work shoes. Joe ended up being Frank’s advisor on how to dress for success.

The music business has been a central part of Joe’s life for over 70 years. However, Joe has held several “day jobs,” mostly in sales positions. According to Joe, “Music was always been something I was trying to escape from. The minute I’d escape, I couldn’t stand it. I had to go back and play. As a young musician, I received a lot of advice from older, experienced musicians. They always said to have a back-up plan.” Joe explained that the dependency of the music business on the liquor business must be recognized. “Once a club starts to fail…the first thing they do is lay off musicians.”

Joe’s first day job was with Revlon, representing the Louisiana area and continuing over to Dallas, Texas. This put him in contact with Neiman-Marcus, a company Joe paid careful attention to, learning a lot of the fundamentals. At the time there were many popular quiz shows, one of which was sponsored by Revlon. There was some cheating involved in the show, and it really hurt Revlon.

Joe’s next job was with Playtex covering a bigger area for two to three years. The pressure for greater sales was intense so Joe moved to Yardley of London. This was a great job, including trips to Great Britain and Europe. Yardley’s head executive in London had a daughter who married a businessman in Little Rock. Through this connection, Joe managed to meet him and escorted him on a visit to Little Rock. When Joe took him to the airport the man asked, “Is there anything I can do for you?” Joe asked him for a job in London.

Unfortunately, the British did not look kindly on giving their jobs to foreigners. However after some consideration, it was worked out that Joe would come over as a consultant, for which Joe admits he was not qualified. The British stint included trips to Paris, Belgium, and a several-week-long trip in 1970 to Russia. He returned to the U.S., continuing to work for Yardley, until they closed their U.S. operations. Prior to this, Yardley had a practice of rewarding employees with a Cadillac. Joe got one.

Joe was an early Hi-Fi buff and had naturally heard of Paul Wilbur Klipsch. Joe built his own speakers but is quick to say that they were nothing compared to what PWK was doing. In early 1955, he drove from Shreveport to Hope on the off chance that he might meet Paul. He was amazed that PWK invited him in, and later took him to lunch.

Paul was “easy to meet, easy to talk to, and easy to get along with, just a great guy. I could sense that he was going to be a fun guy because I never knew what he was going to do or say.”

When Paul discovered that Joe had his drums in the car, he asked Joe to play them in a live versus recorded scenario during their first encounter. PWK said he wanted to play some records and asked Joe to bring his drums inside. He pointed a speaker right at Joe. He wanted Joe to play along with his Glen Miller music. Fortunately, Joe had just gotten out of the Army Band and knew all of the arrangements by heart!

Joe played along with the recorded drummer exactly, which fascinated PWK. This exercise was conducted in the hallway of what is now Klipsch’s Hope office building, with Joe not being able to see whether the source materials were records or tapes (dammit). The result was the beginning of a serious dialog on possible collaborations.

Shortly after, they were doing a live versus recorded demo for a large audience in an auditorium at Centenary College. Dealers and the public were invited. Curtains hid a speaker on one side and a drum set on the other. Joe would play and then a recording of Joe would be alternated. The audience was asked to identify the live performance. Several more of these demonstrations were staged.

Soon Paul suggested a recording session. On the morning of June 19, 1955, Joe and the short-lived Joe Holland Quartet entered KWKH in Shreveport, Louisiana. At the same time, Elvis Presley was exiting the studio. He and his band recorded all night due to Elvis’ proclivity to put five notes in a four-note bar. The band members were afraid to call him out, so they just kept telling him that they had made a mistake and needed another take. [Do not irritate Elvis!] Elvis’ drummer, D.J. Fontana was a good friend of Joe’s and related the events of the previous night.

The recording session lasted most of the day, but included no pictures or other documentation – just the music. All songs were recorded straight through without mixing. Playback at the studio was via a pair of Klipsch Rebels as they were small enough to fit in the back of Paul’s airplane. If there were a serious mistake or flaw noted in the initial playback, the whole number would be repeated. Only a few required retakes. Extraneous noises were left in some of the recordings. One noise that was thought to be the drummer’s chair squeaking was actually a pedal. Joe used a Ludwig Speed King, which has also been referred to as a “Squeak King.” Unfortunately, it is not known if any of the band members ever heard their finished product on Klipschorns. [Joe has not, but I plan to remedy that!] Joe had Rebels………………

In 1957, a second recording session was arranged with a reunited Joe Holland Quartet. Paul explained to Joe that during his demos at frequent dealer visits, many people would request a copy of the material. At the time, the KlipschTape division had just been created with the help of John Eargle. Joe recalls that John represented himself as an A&R man from RCA. As with the earlier recording session in 1955, PWK utilized a Berlant tape recorder and two widely spaced, omnidirectional Stephens microphones. The second session did not seem to impress the band like the first. A “been there, done that” mentality could have been at play.

PWK and Joe remained in contact for many years. Joe knew some generals at Barksdale Air Force base. He arranged to take a General Westmoreland (the “lesser” Westmoreland) up to Hope to visit with PWK. The General was a huge Klipsch fan, so it was somewhat amusing to see his “subservient posture” in Paul’s presence. Joe gave at least another general the same “audience with King Klipsch.” Much later, PWK orchestrated, pun intended, an invitation from Arthur Fiedler for Joe to play with the Boston Pops. Unfortunately, this never materialized due at least in part to the pressure of Joe’s day job.

In the 1980’s PWK ran into Joe at Cajun’s Wharf in Little Rock. It had been 20 years since they had seen each other but Paul instantly recognized Joe. At 88, Joe lives on the west side of Little Rock, and is still getting paid to play his drums.

 

2016 Klipsch Pilgrimage Preview

On May 20th, over 125 Klipsch fans will descend upon the rural town of Hope, Arkansas as part of annual celebration, dubbed the Klipsch Pilgrimage. Attendees will come together as a community to share their passion for Klipsch speakers and the employees who lovingly handcraft them.

Of course, this is not the first year for the Klipsch Pilgrimage. It’s been going on for quite some time now with the trip flip-flopping between Hope, where we have a manufacturing facility, warehouse and museum, and Indianapolis, where our corporate, engineering, marketing and customer service headquarters reside.

It is fitting, though, that attendees are trekking their way down to Hope because this year makes the 70th year since Paul W. Klipsch founded the company in the small Arkansas town. This year will be the first time that the trip has been entirely planned and executed by Klipsch fans themselves, many of whom are members of the Klipsch Forums.

“Klipsch and its forum members have a relationship that most companies can only hope to achieve. It is based on mutual respect for high quality speakers and preserving the high standards that Paul W. Klipsch started this company with seventy years ago in that small tin shed in Hope, Arkansas. The close friendships we have made with members on the forum and Klipsch employees became the driving force behind my interest in coordinating the annual Pilgrimage this year. I hope that we can pass the emotion, respect and loyalty we have for Klipsch down to many generations to come,” said Christy Luquet, Klipsch forum moderator and brand enthusiast.

As they did for the 2015 Klipsch Pilgrimage, Christy and her fellow forum members will show their appreciation for the Klipsch employees that handcraft each speaker beloved by many around the world by treating them to a special lunch.

You simply don’t see any other audio companies with fans like this. These devoted people are paying out of their own pocket to go on the Klipsch Pilgrimage AND they’re giving many of us lunch to boot! Seriously.

When you have customers who care so much, it genuinely makes us want to work harder and strive each and every day to make better speakers and headphones. It is humbling to say the least.

During the rest of the Klipsch Pilgrimage, these generous fans will get to tour the Klipsch plant, audio labs and museum, as well as getting demonstrations of both new and current Klipsch speakers. Klipsch historian Jim Hunter and principal engineer Roy Delgado will be tackling the tough questions during a Q&A session. Both Jim and Roy have had the privilege of working first-hand with Paul W. Klipsch and have a combined 65 years of experience with the company. They’ve seen everything!

70th Anniversary Heresy III factory 1 social

Many attendees have also been chomping at the bit to see the 70th anniversary limited edition Klipschorn and Heresy III speakers, which were handcrafted right in the Hope facility that they’ll be touring. We’re sure that they will examine every little differentiating feature about these speakers including the Australian walnut wood veneer, special edition logos, unique grille clothes and, of course, the special, signed plaques on the back.

We are also very excited to welcome special guest Colleen Murphy, founder of the Classic Album Sundays (CAS) organization, to Hope for the Klipsch Pilgrimage. She’s flying all the way from the United Kingdom to be a part of this unique event. Murphy is dedicated to the vinyl revolution, sharing the stories behind noteworthy albums and orchestrating in-depth listening sessions on hi-fi audio systems for the fellow music enthusiasts.

“I’ve been a Klipsch enthusiast for over two decades. I’ve DJ’d in venues from London to New York City to Tokyo on dance floors surrounded by multiple Klipschorns, the same speakers I have squeezed into the living room of my home and that started Classic Album Sundays. Needless to say, Klipsch is in my DNA. I am looking forward to learning more about the brand’s legendary history and spending time with like-minded Klipsch fans.”

Klipsch speakers reproduce the power detail and emotion of the live music experience… something akin to a religious experience. This explains why so many devotees are descending upon the homeland in Hope to give praise at the 2016 Klipsch Pilgrimage. Amen!

If you would like to know more about the Klipsch Pilgrimage and chat with some of the people who will be going, visit www.Klipsch.com/Forums

Register for the Klipsch Pilgrimage (open until May 15)

Important Information for Attendees

Have you gone to a Pilgrimage before? Are you going this year? Let us know in the comments!

Good Poop: The First Time I Saw Paul W. Klipsch

Way back in 1976, I found myself in Philadelphia for my first professional society meeting –  the Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, IEEE International Conference on ICASSP. (Whew! What a mouthful.)

As a “green kid” of nearly 25, I was still working as a driver engineer at Rola, one of the USA’s earliest original equipment driver suppliers. Believe it or not, there was a substantial speaker driver manufacturing industry in the USA before Mexico, and then China, assumed dominance respectively.

I was surprised to see this somewhat scruffy old guy walking down the aisle during a paper presentation handing out some kind of trinket. Later I discovered that he was the presenter of the paper I had had come to see: “Loudspeaker Distortion” (included in our Audio Papers collection).

This was the first time I laid eyes on Paul W. Klipsch.

The trinket was nothing less than the little yellow BS button! In the context of a “sophisticated society event”, it was a bit mind-bending to this youngster.

Two years later I would meet him formally for an interview in Hope, Arkansas, and also learn the meaning of his little yellow button.

Do you have your own Paul W. Klipsch story that would be good for “Good Poop”? Post it in the comments below

Good Poop: PWK the Practical Joker

In the fall of 1974, future Klipsch Chief Engineer Gary Gillum sent PWK a present. At the time Gary worked for Silver Dollar City in Branson, MO contributing to rides and illusory attractions. The gift looked exactly like a brick but was made out of foam.

On Nov. 25, 1974 PWK wrote to Gillum:

“Thanks for the brick. I have thrown it at Ruth (his secretary), Bob (President), and a couple of guys in the shop. I’m planning on (as you suggest) trying it on a police car windshield — that might be the way to meet the new chief.”

Belle Klipsch typed this letter to Gary and added her own P.S.:

“Paul had a great time throwing the “brick” at the plate glass window at the Trade Winds Café this afternoon!”

This incident pre-dates my tenure by 4 years (he was only 70!). In my experience, this type of mischievous humor was Paul’s calling card until the end.

Anyone have a PWK practical joke to relate?

Good Poop: PWK Car Loan

In 1979, returning from our first vacation while working for Klipsch, my wife and I encountered a deer at 70 MPH. That was in Nashville, TN, and it extended our vacation by a few days.

We patched up with the car with a used radiator and it limped home. The car died soon after and we had to cancel our planned weekend trip to Fayetteville, AR for a concert. When PWK heard our situation – he immediately offered to loan us his Audi. That’s the kind of guy he was. I had been working at Klipsch for less than a year and was as “scruffy” as the rest of his employees, yet he was willing to go out of his way to help me.

Traveling between Hope and Fayetteville still requires mostly two-lane highways. Additionally, crop-dusters are very common in this part of the country.

We were on a slightly elevated section of the highway when I looked out of the driver’s side window straight into the propeller of a bi-plane! I ducked, but didn’t swerve. He climbed.

– JRH

New to Good Poop? You can learn more here.

Good Poop: Cultural Dynamic Range

Back in the seventies when a new engineer or salesman was hired at Klipsch, part of the on-boarding program was dinner at Paul W. Klipsch’s.

Not long after I started, my wife Becky and I were invited to Paul and Valerie’s relatively modest home. Valerie’s mastery of Austrian cuisine was at work, making dinner outstanding. Strudel for dessert as I recall. After dinner was over libations were in order and Paul stuck with one of his favorites, Glenlivet whiskey.

Shortly we adjourned to the living room to audition his Klipschorn/Belle Klipsch three channel set-up. The Klipschorns were in false corners, as the room had doorways at every corner, not to mention a grand piano. Naturally the program material was reel-to-reel masters that he had recorded. At least some of it was the “Arkansas Sympathy” (his twist on words). Without question it was the finest reproduced music I had ever heard.

The Klipsch family home in Hope, Arkansas.  - The Klipsch Joint

The Klipsch family home in Hope, Arkansas.

 

After several symphonic selections were savored Paul got up and shuffled over to the equipment rack mumbling about some other material he had. What came next was clearly “out of phase” culturally.

I knew I had made the right decision in moving to Arkansas. We were listening to various verbal descriptions of farts, followed by their sonic signature. I am aware of the “Great Crepitation Contest of 1946” recording and this could have been what we were hearing, but after 36 years I am not certain. If anyone can shed additional light on “farts and their descriptions”, it would be most appreciated.

New to Good Poop? You can learn more here.

Good Poop: Worker’s Comp – The 2nd Day

On Monday, October 2, 1978, I started working for Klipsch and Associates. On Tuesday I was introduced to the “on-boarding” program, which at that time included actually building a Klipschorn woofer cabinet. This was mandatory for all engineering and sales newbies. You damn sure KNEW the product!

In the actual assembly of the K-horn cabinet (not including sub-assemblies) the primary fasteners are screws. With proper assembly these could actually be removed after the glue has dried, as an airtight glue bond is the real strength of the cabinet. However, there are four small ½” plywood pieces called wings.

The photo above shows an actual builder with his left knuckles almost touching a wing. They allow the “sinuses” to become part of the back air chamber, and at the same time seal the back from the front. These are attached with nails. I had successfully installed at least one of them.

Being cocky, I decided that I could drive those nails into place with just two swings of the hammer.  Well, one of those enthusiastic swings perfectly targeted my left index finger nail. Blue air followed.

Fortunately, it was close to the lunch break and PWK was taking the engineers to the Holiday Inn for some grub.  It was obvious to all in attendance that I was in severe discomfort.  Good old PWK insisted that I keep the finger in a glass of ice water all during lunch.

In spite of the pain multiplying several fold, I managed to follow orders. The next day I had the nail drilled to relieve the pressure, and waited a week or two for it to fall off.

That nail is in a jar somewhere…

Got a good build story involving injury? We want to hear about it (if it’s not too gruesome). And if you’re new to Good Poop, you can learn more here.

Good Poop: What is it?

The title of our blog series speaks to me on several levels.

A Google search (be very careful there…) suggests the word “poop” is optionally defined as:

Noun, slang
relevant information, especially a candid or pertinent factual report; low-down:
“Send a reporter to get the real poop on that accident.”
Origin
1945-50, Americanism; apparently extracted from poop sheet;

And for poop sheet:

noun, Slang
a circular, list of instructions, press release, etc., providing information about a particular subject.

1. This is a “vintage” phrase. The timing of its origin appears to match that of Klipsch & Associates.
2. I have heard Paul W. Klipsch use the term.
3. It was actually used as a headline in a 1982 Klipsch Pro bulletin. (Read)
4. And finally, it is not politically correct!

Welcome aboard! Hopefully “Good Poop” will keep you amused, and you will keep me honest.

– Jim Hunter

Good Poop: Meet Jim Hunter – Klipsch Historian

Listen up… In the world of audio technology, there are pseudo-superstars, false prophets, and those who claim to be golden ears – but there is no comparison to the straight engineering and audio experience of Jim Hunter – Program Manager and Klipsch Historian at Klipsch Group, Inc.

Jim Hunter (Left) and Paul W. Klipsch (Right) pose with a giant foam horn.

Jim Hunter (Left) and Paul W. Klipsch (Right) pose with a giant foam horn.

Company founder Paul W. Klipsch hired Hunter as a transducer engineer in Hope, Arkansas 36 years ago today. Hunter has since served as a design engineer, production engineer, engineering manager, director of design engineering, VP of design engineering and company historian. The Klipsch Museum of Audio History has been on his job description since 1979.

Hunter began his career with the Rola Company, an OEM driver manufacturing company, in 1974. He and PWK co-authored U.S. Patent #4,387,786, an anechoic chamber featuring a multi-functional revolving door. Jim has been a key contributor to more than 150 Klipsch-branded loudspeakers sold in specialty audio retail stores around the world.

Jim has been a member of the Audio Engineering Society since 1979 and a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers since 1974. To put it simply… When Jim speaks, you’ll want to listen.

That’s why we’re beginning a new series on our blog called Good Poop. Jim will be featured in this blog posting stories and historical facts from Jim’s personal and professional relationship with PWK and the Klipsch brand.

Up next: What is Good Poop?