Tag Archives: heresy speakers

40 Years and Counting with Klipsch Heresy Speakers

When Candace Tinkler turned 20 years old, her father treated her to Klipsch Heresy speakers. Now, 40 years later, Candace remains in love with the speakers she received on her 20th birthday.

“It was a big deal to splurge on these luxury items,” Tinkler said. “My father had a deep love of music which he shared with me. He grew up during The Great Depression and his family didn’t have money for him to take music lessons, so he showered me with musical opportunities that he never had.”

Before making the leap, Tinkler and her father did their research. Although she doesn’t remember exactly what the key reasons were for picking the Heresy speakers, Tinker had spoken with both her professional musician friends and employees from several high-end audio stores who all recommended Klipsch.

After hearing a demo of these handcrafted speakers at a specialty audio store in San Francisco, her Dad was so excited that he purchased a pair for the family home in addition to the pair he bought for her. Although he may have passed away two years ago at the age of 89, his Heresy speakers continue to rock in the family home.

Since their purchase in 1975, Tinkler’s Heresy speakers have been moved all over the United States, far away from the speakers’ birthplace in Hope, Arkansas. As a National Park Service employee, they have “survived” Zion, Bighorn Canyon, Channel Islands, Grand Canyon, Everglades, New River Gorge and, currently, Redwood National Parks.

The question of whether it is worth it to carry these 44 lb. speakers from place to place is downright silly to Tinkler.

“I love these speakers! I have never thought of myself as a hoarder and, in fact, I am a bit ruthless about getting rid of junk that doesn’t work to my expectations. On the other hand, I hang on to things I love.”

Currently residing in Crescent City, California, Tinkler’s American-made speakers have gained notoriety throughout the town.

“Every July 4th during the fireworks, I open the windows, turn the speakers towards the street and crank the volume up crazy high. Everyone cheers! It is a town tradition. The speakers are so loud, it is like a rock concert!”

The speakers’ survival and impeccable condition even more remarkable because Tinkler never even got around to staining the speakers’ bare wood.

“Can you believe it?”

Heck, yes. This is Klipsch.

 

How long have you had your Klipsch speakers? Post a comment below!

Candace Tinkler Klipsch Heresy Speakers

Klipsch Install Stories: John Varvatos

If you’ve ever seen an ad for John Varvatos, you will know that that the men’s lifestyle brand is all about rock-and-roll. From Iggy Pop to Alice Cooper to Green Day, the brand associates itself closely with rockers from multiple generations.

This attitude and tone of voice comes straight down from the brand’s namesake – John Varvatos – whose passion for music runs deep. He grew up idolizing the musicians he now features in advertisements and even has a store in the former site of the famed punk-club CBGB.

John Varvatos

When it came to designing a flagship store in his hometown of Detroit, the three-time “Menswear Designer of the Year” turned to Klipsch to fulfill his audio needs and deliver the best experience for his customers.

“Music is deeply rooted within the John Varvatos brand. Thanks to Klipsch, who placed killer speakers throughout our Detroit Store, our clients are enveloped in state-of-the-art sounds, adding to an enhanced shopping experience.”

The newest John Varvatos store is now equipped with Klipsch Heresy III speakers and Klipsch Reference subwoofers. These Klipsch Heresy speakers have exposed cabinets with a slick black finish with custom grilles that fits perfectly with the gritty design of the store’s interior. (Click here to see more photos.)

Klipsch Heresy Speakers John Varvatos Detroit

But Varvatos didn’t just turn to Heresy speakers because they are “a rock’n’roller’s dream speaker” as noted audiophile and professional reviewer Steven Guttenberg dubbed them in a Stereophile editorial.

“Back in the late 70’s when I really got into audio and discovered the difference of great sound, I saved up and bought a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers. The quality difference was incredible. They became the standard to which I have listened to quality audio ever since.”

It’s a story that’s similar to those of Klipsch fans all across the world.

 

Check out more Klipsch Install Stories.

 

 

Dads That Rock: Heresy Is Good for the Soul

It is no great surprise that many of our life-long obsessions with music and great audio began with our fathers. The blog series “Dads That Rock” is an on-going Father’s Day tribute to these great men who helped inspire our passions. “JimJimbo” from the Klipsch Forums submitted the story below with minimal edits by the Klipsch editorial staff.

My mom and dad were both raised in the 1930’s and 1940’s and loved all kinds of music. They had very eclectic tastes from big band to Kingston Trio folk, Herb Alpert, Sinatra, Elvis, Beatles and even some light rock.

We lived in Grand Rapids, Michigan at the time. Around 1972 my dad bought a huge, gorgeous walnut console stereo with a turntable and AM/FM tuner. He was very proud of it and the console was the star of our living room.

My dad was a sales manager for a large automotive company and there were quite a few parties that took place at our home for clients and friends. The music was always playing and turned up!

Soon after, in 1974, I joined the Navy and was sent to San Diego for boot camp. Upon completion, we were let loose in town and I happened to spot a stereo shop there (the name escapes me).

I went in and spent some time listening to a few sets of speakers, receivers and amplifiers. I was immediately taken with a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers that I heard.

With the money I had saved during my time in boot camp, I purchased the Heresy speakers and had them shipped home to Grand Rapids. I went home on leave before my next assignment and the Heresy speakers were there waiting.

I had to find something to power them, so a friend loaned me a cool Sansui integrated amp. I think it was an AU-777 and a decent turntable. The system went down to the basement and for the next week or so lots of Hendrix, Traffic, Allman Brothers and Clapton were played.

My dad came down a couple of times to ask me to turn it down, but when he reached the bottom of the stairs and heard the stunning difference between his precious console and the Heresy system, he stayed for a while and listened.

I went off to Submarine school and then to a boat in Pearl Harbor for a year or so. When I returned on leave the next time to my parents home, guess which system was in the living room and which was in the basement?

This was the beginning of my love for Klipsch.

 

Do you have a story about your dad that rocks and his Klipsch speakers? Post it in the comments below and/or email it to alex.leopold@klipsch.com

Klipsch Heresy Speakers: From Germany to New York to California

Back in 1983, Todd Fitchette was serving as a military policeman for the U.S. Army and stationed in Kaiserslautern, Germany. Fresh out of high school, he was keen on purchasing a sound system in which he could use inside his quarters.

“If there was one thing a young soldier at the time used for bragging rights, it was his stereo system.”

Fitchette first heard Klipsch speakers in high school, where a classmate who ran the high school dances would bring in Klipsch La Scala speakers to use with the rest of his sound equipment. The La Scalas impressed Fitchette with their ability to play the Eagles, Styx, the Bee Gees and other popular dance songs of that generation.

“You not only heard the sound, but you felt it too. I recall being surprised at how big they were and how loud (and clear) they were. I thought their shape was quite cool, too.”

Now, obviously, the La Scalas were too big for Fitchette to lug from the store to the barracks, much less on his subsequent moves, but he did find another suitable option at the military post exchange (PX) in the Vogelweh Military Community– Klipsch Heresy speakers.

His best point of comparison was a pair of Infinity speakers that his roommate owned that Fitchette thought were the “cat’s meow.” Of course, there was no real comparison with the Heresy speakers.

“I simply liked them over the other speakers, including those my roommate had.”

So, the young soldier had decided on the speakers he wanted, but he’s in Germany and it’s 1983. It’s not like he could’ve ordered online at Klipsch.com with free shipping.

After flagging down a suitably sized cab, Fitchette shoved the speakers inside the backseat. The Heresy speakers may be the smallest of the Klipsch Heritage Series; however, they still pose a formidable challenge when trying to transport them in a standard sedan.

The cab took him to the train station, where the second challenging part of these speakers’ journey took place. Fitchette’s biggest concern was getting them on and off the train quickly.

“I knew I had to do it quickly to avoid having one left on the dock of the train station or on the train itself. One thing about the train system in West Germany at the time was they all ran on time. I figured I simply had to put one on the train car and then quickly put the other on the car then move them to where I was sitting.”

Despite some hairy moments, the speakers made it back in one piece to the base. Fitchette never heard one negative thing about them while he was overseas. Well, except for being told to “turn it down” because they were disturbing other soldiers in the barracks that were more than 200 feet away.

Of course, he couldn’t just let the speakers stay in Germany when it was time to come home. They were first shipped back to New York and then eventually all the way to California where Fitchette resides today.

“The wood is still in excellent condition and the speakers still sound good.”

When Fitchette purchased the speakers, they came unfinished, but he stained them into a darker oak finish and they look right at home in the living room, wherever across the planet that may be.

“So that’s it… no stories about how they were hooked up to amps powering guitars played by rock stars or used in a pinch at a concert because the roadies forgot to pack the speakers. Just a story about a guy with a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers.”

Craiglist Encounter: Klipsch Heresy Speakers

Klipsch Heresy speakers inside Steve Bales' home.

Klipsch Heresy speakers inside Steve Bales’ home.

From tickets to couches to TVs to…err…“encounters”, you never know what you’re going to get with Craigslist.

Rewind about two and a half years ago when Steve Bales purchased his first set of Klipsch speakers – a pair of Reference RF-62 II floorstanding speakers.

“I was impressed by the detail and lifelike sound in our high-ceiling living room,” Bales said.

Bales was so impressed that he joined the Klipsch Forums, engaging with a bustling online community of Klipsch devotees.

“I learned about the different capabilities of each line and Heritage intrigued me. At a time when many consumer goods are manufactured overseas, they continue to be manufactured Hope, Arkansas. That was appealing. The quality construction, efficiency and musicality of the Klipsch Heritage Series were even more attractive.”

Thus, a quest to find a pair of vintage Klipsch speakers was born.

With no audio shop stocking the Heritage Series near his home in Peachtree Corners, Georgia (north side of Atlanta), Bales inevitably found himself scanning Craigslist where he could easily scour the surrounding areas and find the object of his new-found affection.

“I thought I could sample what the Heritage Series had to offer by purchasing on the used market to see what all the fuss was about.”

Bales found a listing in the little town of Ball Ground for a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers that were made in 1980. This was a very meaningful year to Bales, as he received his graduate degree, began his career and married his beloved.

Of course, Bales auditioned the speakers first to make sure they were in working condition. After all, no one wants to get burned after driving an hour and back.

They sounded amazing which didn’t surprise Bales, but what did surprise him is their astounding pedigree.

Robert Moulson performing in Of Mice and Men

Robert Moulson performing in Of Mice and Men

Turns out, the speakers had belonged to the owner’s father-in-law, Robert Moulson. Moulson was an American classical tenor who performed in operas and concerts in the United Sates and Europe from the 1950s through the 1980s.

Bales also learned that Moulson performed a great deal in Germany and is perhaps most famous for his role of Lenny Small in Carlisle Floyd’s Of Mice and Men.

“I can imagine Mr. Moulson enjoying all genres of music on these Klipsch speakers, but particularly opera and the show tunes he loved to sing.”

The trip to Ball Ground was entirely worth it for the speakers and ended up meaning much more.

“I loved meeting Mr. Moulson’s daughter and son-in-law and learning about him. I might even develop an interest in opera!  I would have bought the speakers anyway, but the story added a dimension I was not expecting.”

Two years after his trip to Ball Ground, the Heresy speakers remain in Bales’ home office paired to a vintage Sansui receiver (also from 1980). He still owns the newer Reference speakers as well, but the Heresy speakers claim a special place in Bales’ heart.

“Klipsch has re-kindled my enjoyment of music all over again.”

Not bad for a Craiglist encounter.

Do you have an interesting story on how you acquired your Klipsch speakers? Post it in the comments below or email alex.leopold@klipsch.com.

WARNING: Purchases of used or new Klipsch speakers or headphones at garage sales, Craigslist, eBay or any other unauthorized dealers void the warranty of the product. Warranties are non-transferrable. To learn more, go to http://www.klipsch.com/policies