Category Archives: Vintage

An Extended Family Through Klipsch

Klipsch is a family. That’s not corporate-rhetoric and it doesn’t just refer those with the last name of Klipsch.

For Christy (“dtel’s wife” on the Klipsch Forum), her path to the Klipsch family began as a child, touring around the country with her parents who owned a portable roller skating rink.

“By the age of 18 months, I had my own roller skates and ‘hit the floor’ dancing with them.  My love of music was born!” said Christy.”

She eventually met her husband Elden (“dtel“) who was already a full-blown “audio geek” and the wheels were set in motion.

Ten years ago, they purchased a set of Klipsch Synergy speakers and joined the Klipsch Forum. They both posted frequently on the Forum, developing a fondness for both the products and the people on the message boards. The Synergy speakers wouldn’t stay for long and they upgraded quickly to three pairs of the Klipsch Forte IIs.

The couple went down to Hope, Arkansas in 2007 for the annual Klipsch Pilgrimage and came back with a pair of Klipsch Cornwall III speakers from a sweepstakes. They wouldn’t stay content with winning speakers, though.

The list of Klipsch products they have purchased is beyond impressive:

“ Our home is truly powered by Klipsch speakers.”

While all of these speakers are great, Christy’s love for Klipsch goes beyond quality products. It’s the sense of community that is so special.

“The Klipsch Forum is like our family.  We rarely miss an opportunity to meet up with our Klipsch friends.  We have traveled to Hope numerous times and even made the trek to Indianapolis for one of the Pilgrimages. “

When Christy says “family,” she means it.

“We make it a point to open our home to Forum members travelling across states, and have had several members as overnight guests. We share our love of “all things Klipsch” with anyone that will listen!”

Christy’s passion has extended to her family, as her daughters and grandchildren have also become Klipsch fans, attending Klipsch Pilgrimages in the past including this year’s employee appreciation event. Christy’s grandson attended his first Pilgrimage when he was four years old! Now 15, he owns a pair of Klipsch Heresy II speakers.

While her husband has been in charge of installing the speakers, Christy and her daughters have decided on aesthetics and helped nudge her husband in the right (louder) direction.

“It was our oldest daughter, Jaime and me that convinced Elden to let us have the MWMs, 402 in our living room. He thought they were too big!”

Audiophiles need not be stereotyped. They come in all forms including that of a proud mother from southern Mississippi who has found a family that keeps on growing.

“I truly lack the words to express what Klipsch means to our family. It’s not just a household brand to us. Each of you are a part of our family.”

 

Happy Mother’s Day! Are you or someone you know an audiophile and a mother? We’d love to hear from you! Post a comment below.

 

 

Therapy Through Klipsch Speakers

Shaun Ivy is a passionate audiophile and a member of Klipsch forums, known there as “wakejunkie”. He is part of a close-knit group of audio enthusiasts who are both the company’s biggest supporters and biggest critics of Klipsch speakers.

He has actually been mentioned on this blog before for receiving the spoils from Michael Stevens’ divorce sale coup, which included Reference RF-7 II floorstanding speakers. As Michael’s best friend, Shaun received them at a “yard sale price.”

Unfortunately, Shaun has had three strokes recently. The doctors gave him a ten percent chance of surviving the first one. Surviving the second one put him at one percent.

Surviving three strokes? Well, it’s a miracle that Shaun is still here.

Prior to suffering his first stroke, Shaun reached out to Klipsch to talk about a different set of speakers he received through a special garage sale find. (Yes, he has two different kick-ass Klipsch speaker setups and, yes, you should be jealous.)

Where Shaun is from, vintage Klipsch speakers are a rare find, but he is always on the lookout for a deal. One day, he just happened to be scouring the yard sales and came across a pair of Klipsch Heresy II speakers. He was excited to say the least.

The owner’s wife was running the yard sale and ran inside the house to ask her husband the price for the Heresy speakers. Shaun was expecting $200-$300 for the pair…

“When she said $25 I about fell out. It was hard to keep my composure. I quickly and quite happily paid her for the speakers and a 50 cent blanket to wrap them in.”

That’s not a typo – $25. He got them in excellent condition with only a couple minor surface imperfections on the cabinets. Everything else, including the cones and grilles, was in perfect shape. They even have sequential serial numbers, dating them to be crafted in 1988.

These speakers replaced a pair of Klipsch Synergy B-2s in Shaun’s living room. They serve as the perfect complement to his separate home theater room, which boasts the aforementioned RF-7 II speakers, a custom-built RF-7 II center channel and four RS-35 speakers to go along with a 130” transparent screen.

Shaun Ivy's Heresy II Speakers

Both these speaker setups have been a welcome retreat for Shaun during his recovery from a multitude of strokes with the speakers in constant use.

“Klipsch therapy has top notch healing abilities.”

The point of this blog post isn’t to pat our backs and scream “KLIPSCH SPEAKERS SAVE LIVES!” Not at all. The point is that the audiophile community is a special one, full of people that care about each other.

Michael posted a topic regarding Shaun’s medical issues and the thread is flooded with people offering their thoughts and prayers. Some of these people Shaun knows very well and some of them he doesn’t. Either way, their comments go a long way towards helping him on his road to recovery.

Shaun Ivy Forum Post

Some people are claiming that great audio doesn’t matter anymore. Well, we call “bullshit.”

When people like Shaun get so much joy out of their systems, it matters. It matters just about as much as anything.

Rock on, Shaun.

 

Do you have a unique story about your Klipsch speakers? Did you get them in an unbelievable deal? Post a comment below and/or email alex.leopold@klipsch.com

Klipsch Heresy Speakers: From Germany to New York to California

Back in 1983, Todd Fitchette was serving as a military policeman for the U.S. Army and stationed in Kaiserslautern, Germany. Fresh out of high school, he was keen on purchasing a sound system in which he could use inside his quarters.

“If there was one thing a young soldier at the time used for bragging rights, it was his stereo system.”

Fitchette first heard Klipsch speakers in high school, where a classmate who ran the high school dances would bring in Klipsch La Scala speakers to use with the rest of his sound equipment. The La Scalas impressed Fitchette with their ability to play the Eagles, Styx, the Bee Gees and other popular dance songs of that generation.

“You not only heard the sound, but you felt it too. I recall being surprised at how big they were and how loud (and clear) they were. I thought their shape was quite cool, too.”

Now, obviously, the La Scalas were too big for Fitchette to lug from the store to the barracks, much less on his subsequent moves, but he did find another suitable option at the military post exchange (PX) in the Vogelweh Military Community– Klipsch Heresy speakers.

His best point of comparison was a pair of Infinity speakers that his roommate owned that Fitchette thought were the “cat’s meow.” Of course, there was no real comparison with the Heresy speakers.

“I simply liked them over the other speakers, including those my roommate had.”

So, the young soldier had decided on the speakers he wanted, but he’s in Germany and it’s 1983. It’s not like he could’ve ordered online at Klipsch.com with free shipping.

After flagging down a suitably sized cab, Fitchette shoved the speakers inside the backseat. The Heresy speakers may be the smallest of the Klipsch Heritage Series; however, they still pose a formidable challenge when trying to transport them in a standard sedan.

The cab took him to the train station, where the second challenging part of these speakers’ journey took place. Fitchette’s biggest concern was getting them on and off the train quickly.

“I knew I had to do it quickly to avoid having one left on the dock of the train station or on the train itself. One thing about the train system in West Germany at the time was they all ran on time. I figured I simply had to put one on the train car and then quickly put the other on the car then move them to where I was sitting.”

Despite some hairy moments, the speakers made it back in one piece to the base. Fitchette never heard one negative thing about them while he was overseas. Well, except for being told to “turn it down” because they were disturbing other soldiers in the barracks that were more than 200 feet away.

Of course, he couldn’t just let the speakers stay in Germany when it was time to come home. They were first shipped back to New York and then eventually all the way to California where Fitchette resides today.

“The wood is still in excellent condition and the speakers still sound good.”

When Fitchette purchased the speakers, they came unfinished, but he stained them into a darker oak finish and they look right at home in the living room, wherever across the planet that may be.

“So that’s it… no stories about how they were hooked up to amps powering guitars played by rock stars or used in a pinch at a concert because the roadies forgot to pack the speakers. Just a story about a guy with a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers.”

Klipsch Install Stories: Chipotle adds Heresy III

Chipotle shines when it comes to providing a distinctive atmosphere that complements its mouthwatering burritos. Every sensation is important to the dining process. This means high quality audio is a critical element of the whole Chipotle experience.

Five years ago, Chipotle and technology design firm OneButton were focused on improving the restaurants’ component system to achieve heightened audio performance for customers.

“When we began exploring new options to bring a higher quality audio system into Chipotle locations, Klipsch speakers were on another level compared to previous systems,” said Matt Emmi, founder and CEO of OneButton. “Klipsch Heresy III speakers provide a precise yet powerful and efficient sound. Since they don’t require a subwoofer, they deliver sonic consistency across locations. Ultimately this provides an experience akin to an audiophile’s living room and represents a product that’s been made by hand in America for decades.”

The Klipsch Heresy III speaker was first introduced in 1957.

The Klipsch Heresy III speaker was first introduced in 1957.

Chipotle reached out to Klipsch’s pro engineer Roy Delgado before the project began to better understand how they could incorporate a retro-style speaker into their commercial environment.

“Chipotle approached us already as big Klipsch fans, especially Heresy III speaker fans and only wanted that speaker installed,” said Delgado. “They initially wanted to mount the speakers, but that would not work with the speaker’s design. So I found a cost-effective solution that would require them being embedded into the walls.

“Klipsch Heresy III speakers provide a precise yet powerful and efficient sound." said founder and CEO of OneButton, Matt Emmi.

“Klipsch Heresy III speakers provide a precise yet powerful and efficient sound.” said founder and CEO of OneButton, Matt Emmi.

All Chipotle restaurants designed since 2009 have an architectural element known throughout the organization as “the box”. This prominent architectural structure houses the beverage station, restrooms and conceals two to four Klipsch Heresy III speakers. The horn midrange, tweeter and conical bass driver are exposed through the wood via an embossed pattern, which follows the geometric lines initiated by drivers.

“We strive to use the architecture of each Chipotle restaurant to enhance the customer experience. We use these architectural elements to highlight the visual connection to the food, reinforce the queue and convey integrity by the use of simple materials used in exceptional ways. We pay close attention to every detail in the environment and that includes the speakers,” notes Mick McConnell, Director of Design for Chipotle.

It’s possible you have noticed that the Heresy III speakers are actually inverted with the woofer at the top. Klipsch systems engineer Trey Cannon explains the reason behind the inversion:

“The speakers may look upside down, but there are things one can do to give a speaker every chance to sound better. In this case, putting the woofer close to the ceiling is ideal. The ceiling provides a corner for the low sounds to reflect from. Like our founder Paul W. Klipsch said, ‘All speakers are corner speakers.’  This also places the mid-range and tweeter closer to the ear of the listener. Someone who cares about sound had a hand in this install.”

Chipotle's "box" design houses two Heresy III speakers at 400 locations nationwide.

Chipotle’s “box” design houses two Heresy III speakers at 400 locations nationwide.

Today, our high-performance Heresy III speakers are powering approximately 400 locations and delivering Chipotle’s curated playlists—straight from its own in-house DJ—Christopher Golub, in a way no other speakers can.

The team continues to implement the Klipsch sound signature not only in new Chipotle locations, but also in its ShopHouse Southeast Asian Kitchen and Pizzeria Locale restaurants. Next time you pay one of these delicious spots a visit, take time to enjoy not only the food but also the ambiance created by Klipsch Audio.

Read more Klipsch Install Stories.

A Product of Divorce: Reference Speakers

Divorce is a terrible thing…unless it ends up with someone getting the best Klipsch Reference Speakers in the world at a bargain price.

Michael Stevens shared his story on the Klipsch Forum (where he is a moderator) and agreed to share his story on The Klipsch Joint. Read his tale below…


Recently, I met a lady with the intent to purchase a pair of original Klipsch Reference RB-81‘s for $208 (for me) and an original RC-64 for $433 (for my friend Wake Junkie). She also had a pair of RS-62 II but I wasn’t really interested in them. Before going, she told me what she would accept for the three speakers and what she would take for all five speakers. I brought enough cash to purchase all five but only planned on buying the RB-81’s and RC-64.

When I arrived, to my surprise, I quickly realized these aren’t the original versions….they are Reference II speakers! She explained that she was recently divorced and she just wanted her ex-husband’s speakers gone from her garage. Before gladly handing her the money – and still in disbelief – I confirmed the amount she said she would take and that I would be receiving the RB-81 II, RC-64 II and the RS-62 II speakers. When I mentioned the RS-62 IIs, she said “No, those aren’t included in the price I gave you. Those were expensive. I was talking about the big speakers”.

I didn’t know she even had “big speakers” for sale.

She walked over to the big speakers and I asked what model they were and she said, “They say RF-7 on the sticker”.

I was about to flip out!

So, I walk over to examine the condition of these Reference speakers and I discover that they are not RF-7 speakers but instead, RF-7 II speakers! I about hit the floor. Not only did she have one pair of RF-7 II, she had two and instead of one pair of RS-62 II, she had two pair!

Michael Stevens Craigslist Post

The original posting on Craiglist for the speakers.

As we were wrapping up, I noticed an Onkyo NR-808 receiver and asked if it was for sale. She said “yes.” I’m guessing it too is just “taking up space.” so I figured, “what the heck.” So, I asked “If I pay your asking price, would you be willing to throw in the Onkyo Receiver?” Without hesitation, she replied, “It was expensive but yes, you can have it”.

At that moment, I was beside myself.

I paid her the money and was loading up my Ford Expedition when I picked up the Onkyo box and it was empty. She realized that the Onkyo is at her mother’s house and fetched her to get it. I only had a few minutes before I absolutely had to go (my wife didn’t even know I was buying speakers).

So with only 10 minutes to get everything loaded, I loaded the last speaker and her mom was not back yet. I had already explained that I was on a tight schedule and MUST leave NO later than 3 PM to give me enough time to get back to meet my wife. At 2:59 PM, I knew I had to go and mom was nowhere in sight so I asked her if I could have one of the pair of RS-62 II speakers instead of the Onkyo receiver and she said “Sure, that’s fine.”

I was seriously ready to faint.

Before I left, she said she had another person coming to buy the rest of the speakers. I texted her several times that night to see if he had come and got no reply. I knew her neighborhood was having a huge community yard sale, so I couldn’t help but wonder if I would be able to purchase the rest of her RF-7 II speaker system.

I went to bed about 30 minutes past midnight but tossed and turned for another 30 minutes. After sleeping on-and-off for a few hours, I decided to just get ready to leave at 6 AM, so I could be at the yard sale when it opened up.

The drive was about one and a half hours away, so I texted her on the way asking how much she would take for the RF-7 II and RS-62 II speakers as well as the RW-10D subwoofer that she also had. I brought the same amount of cash that I had the day before. It seemed like she looked up the value of the speakers again and realized she sold them for much less than she could have because she replied with twice as much as what I paid for the seven speakers the day before.

Ouch!

I didn’t have enough to buy them at that price, but I asked how much for just the RF-7 II and RS-62 II speakers and it turned out to be only a few hundred less. It was still above my budget, but how much for just the RF-7 II speakers? Still about $500 less than what I had.

At this point, I was still in the car and I told her that I was 10 minutes away and I would be willing to offer what I had with me for the RF-7 II and the RS-62 II speakers. She said sorry, but she had a better offer.

I told her I would be in the community until 8 AM since “the other guy” was supposed to come at 7:30 AM to buy the speakers. At 8 AM, I showed up and the guy supposedly came by and wanted to buy them and was going to the bank but that was 1 hour ago. I guessed either he wasn’t coming back or he never existed. She did not want to sell them for my asking price, so I thanked her for considering my offer, wished her well on her yard sale and drove back home. It was worth the risk even if I had driven three hours round-trip for nothing.

Later that night, I could not get it out of my head. Did she sell the speakers to “the other guy”?

The yard sale was over and my guess was she has no prospects to buy the speakers. I texted her back and said, “If they are still available, I would be willing to make one final trip and offered her another $100 from my original offer.”

To my surprise, she texted me the next afternoon saying that she would accept my offer!

After my wife called 911 and the paramedics got a pulse back, I quickly went by the ATM and began my third three-hour round-trip to pick up the remaining speakers. When I arrived, I chatted with the seller and her daughter. They were simply grateful that they finally had garage space once again. They wished me well with my new speakers and hoped I had a safe drive home.

Wakejunkie Reference RF-7 II Speakers

Michael Stevens got his second pair of RF-7 II into the hands of fellow Klipsch forums member “Wakejunkie” whose setup you can see here.

I share my story as an encouragement to all that there still are some AMAZING deals to be had if you are patient and have some cash on hand set aside for those deals.

At no point did I try and manipulate or mislead her. I had a certain amount of cash available that I was willing to spend and made an offer. She had speakers that were of no value to her and was willing to exchange that for the cash I had to offer.

Sometimes they accept your offer, sometimes they don’t. I definitely did not “need” any more Klipsch speakers but the price was right and I was glad to purchase them all from her.


Great story, right?

Michael told us one of his “audio goals is to have owned every (or close to every) Reference and Heritage speaker Klipsch has made.” So, it’s safe to say that he is always on the prowl for Klipsch speakers.

Michael Stevens Speaker List

Michael Stevens took a screenshot on his computer of a list of all the photo albums he has for his collection of speakers.

Next on Michael’s list? The Cornwall, Klipschorn and ever-elusive Belle.

Maybe a few more people just need to get divorced. Not that we would ever wish that!

 

Craiglist Encounter: Klipsch Heresy Speakers

Klipsch Heresy speakers inside Steve Bales' home.

Klipsch Heresy speakers inside Steve Bales’ home.

From tickets to couches to TVs to…err…“encounters”, you never know what you’re going to get with Craigslist.

Rewind about two and a half years ago when Steve Bales purchased his first set of Klipsch speakers – a pair of Reference RF-62 II floorstanding speakers.

“I was impressed by the detail and lifelike sound in our high-ceiling living room,” Bales said.

Bales was so impressed that he joined the Klipsch Forums, engaging with a bustling online community of Klipsch devotees.

“I learned about the different capabilities of each line and Heritage intrigued me. At a time when many consumer goods are manufactured overseas, they continue to be manufactured Hope, Arkansas. That was appealing. The quality construction, efficiency and musicality of the Klipsch Heritage Series were even more attractive.”

Thus, a quest to find a pair of vintage Klipsch speakers was born.

With no audio shop stocking the Heritage Series near his home in Peachtree Corners, Georgia (north side of Atlanta), Bales inevitably found himself scanning Craigslist where he could easily scour the surrounding areas and find the object of his new-found affection.

“I thought I could sample what the Heritage Series had to offer by purchasing on the used market to see what all the fuss was about.”

Bales found a listing in the little town of Ball Ground for a pair of Klipsch Heresy speakers that were made in 1980. This was a very meaningful year to Bales, as he received his graduate degree, began his career and married his beloved.

Of course, Bales auditioned the speakers first to make sure they were in working condition. After all, no one wants to get burned after driving an hour and back.

They sounded amazing which didn’t surprise Bales, but what did surprise him is their astounding pedigree.

Robert Moulson performing in Of Mice and Men

Robert Moulson performing in Of Mice and Men

Turns out, the speakers had belonged to the owner’s father-in-law, Robert Moulson. Moulson was an American classical tenor who performed in operas and concerts in the United Sates and Europe from the 1950s through the 1980s.

Bales also learned that Moulson performed a great deal in Germany and is perhaps most famous for his role of Lenny Small in Carlisle Floyd’s Of Mice and Men.

“I can imagine Mr. Moulson enjoying all genres of music on these Klipsch speakers, but particularly opera and the show tunes he loved to sing.”

The trip to Ball Ground was entirely worth it for the speakers and ended up meaning much more.

“I loved meeting Mr. Moulson’s daughter and son-in-law and learning about him. I might even develop an interest in opera!  I would have bought the speakers anyway, but the story added a dimension I was not expecting.”

Two years after his trip to Ball Ground, the Heresy speakers remain in Bales’ home office paired to a vintage Sansui receiver (also from 1980). He still owns the newer Reference speakers as well, but the Heresy speakers claim a special place in Bales’ heart.

“Klipsch has re-kindled my enjoyment of music all over again.”

Not bad for a Craiglist encounter.

Do you have an interesting story on how you acquired your Klipsch speakers? Post it in the comments below or email alex.leopold@klipsch.com.

WARNING: Purchases of used or new Klipsch speakers or headphones at garage sales, Craigslist, eBay or any other unauthorized dealers void the warranty of the product. Warranties are non-transferrable. To learn more, go to http://www.klipsch.com/policies 

Made in America: An Introduction

“Made in America” is a phrase these days that few companies have the ability to say. American engineers, craftsmen and builders construct some of the finest-quality products ever made.

Heck, Paul W. Klipsch designed and hand-built the legendary Klipschorn in a tiny tin shed in Hope, Arkansas. He was an American audio pioneer and a true eccentric.

Klipsch  began in a tin shed in Hope, Arkansas.

Klipsch began in a tiny tin shed in Hope, Arkansas in 1946.

Since 1946, Klipsch has continued to proudly build speakers in the heart of America. And to honor PWK’s patriotic spirit, we’d like to acknowledge other brands that can proudly say their products are made in America.

So be on the lookout for our blog to feature quality products built in our nation that display the true craftsmanship that can only be found in the U.S.A.

What companies or products do you have or support that are American made?

Good Poop: PWK as Heil Mentor

Bob Heil and Heil Sound were clearly at the forefront of the modern touring sound industry. The four-channel system for The Who’s Quadrophenia, and the Heil Talk Box (can you say Frampton?), are two of his credits. The Grateful Dead’s use of Bob’s system might even be credited for inspiring their “wall of sound.” If it rocked in the 70’s, he was all over it.

Bob freely credits Paul W. Klipsch (PWK) with steering him in the right direction technologically. In the early 70’s, Paul telephoned Bob “out of the blue”, asking if there was a nearby cornfield he could land his plane in. When the shock wore off, Bob said “sure!”

A few days later, PWK landed near Marissa, IL to check out exactly what this whipper-snapper was doing. He must have been impressed, as he flew Bob and one of his employees back to Hope, AR to get some schoolin’. Two days in Hope had Bob reeling from the classic audio references Paul brought to his attention. The Bell Labs work in the “Symposium on Auditory Perspective” was central to Bob’s education.

Klipsch Runt LaScala custom made for Bob Heil

Klipsch Runt LaScala

Some years later, as Heil Sound essentially “took over the world”, Bob returned to Hope and begged PWK to build him some special, smaller LaScala speakers for monitors that would satisfy his client Jeff Beck. Paul begrudgingly complied, although he apparently did not reveal that he had made “runt” LaScala speakers sporadically since 1966.

In later years Paul would emphatically express his distaste for rock music. However, during one of Bob’s visits to Hope, he must have been keeping his personal opinions to himself since the outdoor testing that he vigorously participated in was fueled with good old rock & roll!

Do you have mentoring stories involving PWK? Let us know below! And if you’re new to Good Poop, you can learn more here.

Garage Sale Gems: Heresy

We’re not gonna lie. Even though the Klipsch Heresy is the most affordable of the Heritage Series of vintage speakers, it’s not for penny-pinchers.

No wonder. Each one is hand-crafted to order in Hope, Arkansas with the finest materials and thus requires a little bit more from the ol’ paycheck.

But they’re worth it.

Noted audiophile and professional reviewer Steven Guttenberg calls the Heresy III a “a rock’n’roller’s dream speaker” in a Stereophile editorial. He lavished even more praise on the Heresy in his CNET.com post: “The sound in my listening room was closer to a live rock concert sound system than I’ve heard from a lot of much more expensive and bigger speakers. That’s what the Heresy IIIs do so well, and once you experience that sort of sound at home, a set of Sonos wireless speakers won’t cut it anymore.”

Nice.

That being said, like any other speaker, you can find used Heresy speakers on Craigslist, eBay, the Klipsch forums, or even local garage sales.

Exhibit A: Klipsch forum member Chris Setlock came across a garage sale on Craigslist with about a dozen or so photos and spotted some nice Sansui components for $25 a pop.

Being a “die hard bargainer,” Chris headed over to the house to negotiate the price of the components. The reply was, “My husband will be down in a minute, he is bringing the speakers.”

Sure enough, said husband comes back with the first speaker in tow and wouldn’t you know what it was…

“I could barely contain myself when the owner appeared with the first speaker,” Chris said.

Chris: How much?

Owner: Eh, $20 each, they’re Klipsch.

Chris: Oh, really?

Owner: Yeah, and they’re heavy.

Chris: You don’t say…

Twenty dollars. For butt-kicking-made-in-the-USA speakers designed by the one and only Paul W. Klipsch.

Throw in $50 worth of Sanui components and Chris walked out with a complete system, and a huge grin on his face, for a mere $90. Of course, he is a bonafide “Klipschster” with 20 pairs of Klipsch speakers at home, including a pair of Heresys, even before this amazing find.

Bottom line: the cliché about garage sales is true: “You never know what you’re going to get.” Or is that a box of chocolates?

Tell us about your amazing finds in the comments below.


WARNING: Purchases of used or new Klipsch speakers or headphones at garage sales, Craigslist, eBay or any other unauthorized dealers void the warranty of the product. Warranties are non-transferrable. To learn more, go to http://www.klipsch.com/policies